Climate, Oil and Resistance

24 November 2005
TNI

  Poster Montreal

Climate, Oil and Resistance
Montreal (Canada), 27 November-8 December 2005

Climate Justice Convergence Centre: Montreal
2070 Rue Clark (near Sherbrooke and St.Laurent)
4 Blocks Northwest of the Palais de Congres
27th November-8th December 2005

Climate, Oil and Resistance

Hear the voices of those directly affected by climate change, the oil and coal industry and carbon trading.

The Climate Justice Convergence Centre is a space where the voices of those struggling against oil and coal extraction, refineries, pollution "offset" projects, a destabilized climate, oil wars and all the other effects of fossil fuel dependence can be heard. Photo-exhibitions, films, speakers and workshops will examine issues ranging from energy use to tree plantations to the World Bank, the G8, carbon trading, nuclear power and genetic engineering.

More info: web www.carbontradewatch.org/durban and blog climatejustice.blogspot.com

Leaflet [PDF document]

Organizers: The Durban Group for Climate Justice, Sierra Youth, Energy Action, Indigenous Environment Network, Environmental Justice Climate Change Initiative, FERN, Transnational Institute, Global Justice Ecology Project, The Corner House, Sustainable Energy & Economy Network/ Institute for Policy Studies, Chesapeake Climate Action Network

Programme of events

Sunday 27 November 2-5 pm

MEETING - Indigenous Peoples Caucus orientation: For Indigenous peoples and Indigenous Peoples Organizations (IPO) participating within the COP11 meeting.
Coordinated by the Indigenous Environment Network

Tuesday 29 November-8 December: 1-7 pm everyday

PHOTO-EXHIBITION - "Where the Trees are a Desert" on the impacts of monoculture eucalyptus plantations in Brazil.

Tuesday 29 November-8 December: 1-7 pm everyday

FILM - Raised Voices: filmed testimonies of those living on the fenceline of the oil industry and views from people in the global South on issues related to climate change.

Tuesday 29 November: 2-4 pm

PANEL - The lessons about pollution trading that Kyoto never learned from the US - Part I: The Kyoto Protocol is based entirely on US pollution trading models. Did these models succeed? Were they just? Did they save money, clean up pollution quickly, or foster innovation or public participation? Can they be applied to global warming? Reviewing the failures is a prerequisite for finding a better way. Speakers: Jutta Kill, Sinks Watch, UK, Prof. Michael K. Dorsey, Environmental Studies Program, Dartmouth College, US and Larry Lohmann, The Corner House, UK

Tuesday 29 November 6.30 pm

OPENING NIGHT - The Climate Justice Convergence Centre welcomes all with a traditional ceremony lead by representatives of the Mohawk Nation of Kanawake. Food by People's Potato with photo-exhibition, music, film and speakers.

Wednesday 30 November: 1-3 pm

PANEL - Indigenous Youth, Climate Impacts and Solutions
Speakers: Wahleah Johns, Black Mesa Water Coalition (USA); Jennifer Duncan, Arctic Indigenous Youth Alliance (Canada); Eddie Spears, Intertribal COUP (USA); Jihan Gearon, Climate Youth Corp - Environmental Justice Climate Change Initiative (USA)

Wednesday 30 November: 4-6 pm

BOOK LAUNCH - Trouble in the Air: Global Warming and the Privatized Atmosphere
This joint publication of Centre for Civil Society in Durban and TNI explores the impacts of the carbon market in South Africa. Connecting energy privatization with issues around the enclosure of the atmosphere, this collection of essays gives a good grounding in the justice implications of the new carbon market. Speakers include writers in the book: Mpumelelo Mhlalisi & Muna Lahkhani, Earthlife Africa, Graham Erion, York University Law School and Larry Lohmann, The Corner House

Wednesday 30 November 7.30-9.30 pm

PANEL - Extraction, Pollution, Offsets, Hurricanes &Wars: Different Locations, Same Struggle - Part I: The climate is changing mainly because fossil carbon is being transferred from below ground to the atmosphere. Taking action means joining alliances against oil extraction, fossil fuel pollution, environmental racism and colonialism, oil wars, and carbon "offset" projects that threaten local livelihoods while licensing further extraction. Speakers: Charles Scheiner, LAOHAMUTUK, Timor-Leste, Ana Filipini, World Rainforest Movement, Uruguay, Asume Osuoka, Environmental Rights Action, Nigeria [tbc], Tom Goldtooth, Indigenous Environmental Network, US, Graham Erion, York University Law School, Canada, Daphne Wysham, Sustainable Energy and Economy Network, US, Wally Menne, Timberwatch, South Africa, Larry Lohmann, The Corner House, UK (moderator)

Thursday 1 December 1-3 pm

PANEL - Indigenous Stories from the Struggle: Dialogue of Indigenous peoples from throughout the Americas, experiencing the links between oil and fossil fuel development, health, climate changes and Indigenous rights. Speakers: Faith Gemmill, REDOIL, Alaska (USA); Elaine Alexis, Arctic Indigenous Youth Alliance Northwest Territories (Canada); Clayton Thomas-Muller, IEN (Canada); Indigenous Representative TBA, Oil Watch (South America)

Thursday 1 December 4-6 pm

WORKSHOP - Forests and Climate Change - Why trading carbon credits from forests means more plantations not less deforestation: Carbon trading is often suggested as a way to finance forest conservation - or slow greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation. Do the assumptions on which this approach is based, hold up? Why is it likely that carbon trading will fail to slow deforestation and lead to more monoculture plantations? Open discussion about the experiences with forest-related carbon 'offset' projects and the concerns about the carbon trading approach to forest protection. Speakers: Jutta Kill, FERN, UK Ana Filipini, World Rainforest Movement (Uruguay), Larry Lohmann, The Corner House, Wally Menne, TimberWatch (South Africa) Tom Goldtooth (IEN).

Thursday 1 December 7.30-9.30 pm

FILM CLUB - Climate change impacts on the Pacific Islands: The film "Rising Waters- global warming and the fate of the Pacific Islanders" will be screened with the director to answer questions and a member of the Pacific Island community to speak. Speakers: Andrea Torrice (film director) and Pacific Islander tbc

Friday 2 December 10.30-12.30 am

PANEL - The lessons about pollution trading that Kyoto never learned from the US - Part II: The Kyoto Protocol is based on US pollution trading models. Did these models succeed? Were they just? Did they save money, clean up pollution quickly, or foster innovation or public participation? Can they be applied to global warming? Reviewing the failures is a prerequisite for finding a better way. Speakers: David M. Driesen, Angela R. Cooney Professor, Syracuse University College of Law, US, Dr. Michael K. Dorsey, Environmental Studies Program, Dartmouth College, US, Larry Lohmann, The Corner House, UK, Jutta Kill, Sinks Watch, UK

Friday 2 December 2-4 pm

WORKSHOP - The World Bank, G8 & Climate Change: moving forward or backward? The World Bank has financed over $25 billion in fossil fuels since 1992, and is one of the largest carbon traders in the world. Other large banks like the IDB are following suit. Now the G8 have asked the World Bank to initiate a "new framework" on climate change. This workshop will give an historical context for this latest challenge to climate stability, the problems with public fossil fuel and carbon trading projects, and ways you can take action to challenge it. Speakers: Daphne Wysham, IPS/SEEN, Nadia Martinez, IPS/SEEN, Asume Osuoka (TBC), Environmental Rights Action/FOE, Nigeria

Friday 2 December 7.30-9.30 pm

PANEL - Extraction, Pollution, Hurricanes, Offsets & Wars: Different Locations, Same Struggle - Part II: The climate is changing mainly because fossil carbon is being transferred from below ground to the atmosphere. Taking action means joining alliances against oil extraction, fossil fuel pollution, environmental racism and colonialism, oil wars, and carbon "offset" projects that threaten local livelihoods while licensing further extraction. Speakers: Arief Wicaksono, JATAM, Indonesia, Clayton Thomas-Muller, Indigenous Environmental Network, US, Norman Philip, Grangemouth community, Scotland, Jutta Kill, Sinks Watch (moderator), Lilliam Indira Marenco Leal, Oilwatch Mesoamerica, Nicaragua [tbc], Souparna Lahiri, Delhi Forum, India [tbc], Renodji Enoch Djimrabaye, RESAP, Chad [tbc], Fabian de Jesus Pacheco Rodriguez, Oilwatch Costa Rica [tbc], Jim Vallette, Sustainable Energy and Economy Network, US

Saturday 3 December 7.30-9.30 pm

FILM CLUB - Video letters from the fenceline of the oil industry in Scotland: Community members living in Scotland with oil pollution on their doorstep learned how to use video and filmed their own stories of living on the fenceline of industry. These 5 minutes shorts will be followed by an opportunity to speak with one of the community members in person about their experiences. Speaker: Norman Philip, Scotland

Sunday 4 December 11-6 pm

WORKSHOPS - Visions for the Movement: skills and tactics to be an effective climate activist. All emerging climate activists are invited to attend a day of essential hands-on trainings. Join Mike Tidwell of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network as he shares the lessons he's learned fighting global warming for over four years. Then choose between eight workshops ranging from campaign strategy to direct action to climate justice. The best and the brightest will be in Montreal; don't miss your chance to be trained by them! Lunch provided. Trainers hail from: Environmental Justice & Climate Change Initiative, Global Exchange, Greenpeace, National Environmental Trust, New Voters Project, Chesapeake Climate Action Network, SustainUS, Sierra Student Coalition

Sunday 4 December 7.30-9.30 pm

PANEL - Visions from the Movement. What inspires you to fight global warming? Are you concerned with the issues of justice? Is it your moral responsibility? Are you excited by the grassroots mobilization efforts? Climate heroes from different aspects within the movement offer their unique and invaluable perspectives on what global warming means to them and how we can fight it. Speakers: Jerome Ringo, Chairman of the National Wildlife Federation; Tom Goldtooth, Indigenous Environment Network; Mike Tidwell, author and Director of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network; Interfaith Power and Light

Monday and Tuesday 5 and 6 December: all day from 9 am

ALTERNATIVE PEOPLE'S FORUM - Workshops by environmental justice activists and indigenous peoples groups. Topics include; Climate Justice Overview > Global Warming Solutions that ensure a Just Transition > Oil, Refineries, and Communities: Impacts and strategies for clean production > Indigenous Peoples Offer Viable Solutions to Reduce Carbon Emissions: Wind not War > The Global Warming Games > Climate Justice by and for the next generation > Lessons learned from Katrina and Rita > State and regional strategies for climate justice. Times to be confirmed. Organized by the Environmental Justice Climate Change Initiative

Monday 5 December 2-4 pm

PANEL - Who Says There are No Alternatives to the Kyoto Carbon Market? The History of an Insult: Today's international climate negotiations revolve around building a global carbon market that has already proved to be both unworkable and unjust. The claim that "there is no alternative" insults both the wide-ranging and constructive work going on elsewhere and a centuries-long legacy of successful conservation and regulation of many kinds. Speakers: Ivonne Yanez, Oilwatch, Ecuador/Peru, Larry Lohmann, The Corner House, UK, Norman Philip, Grangemouth community, Scotland

Tuesday 6 December 7.30-9.30 pm

FILM CLUB - Nuclear power & climate change: The nuclear industry has recently reinvented itself as the solution to climate change with surprising support from environmentalists. This has invigorated a dying industry and much government action on climate change is centred around building new power plants. This film looks at the world trends towards liberalization of the nuclear industry and the discussion after looks at the connections with the climate debate. Speakers: Wendela de Vries (World Information Service on Energy, Netherlands) and Adam Ma'anit (editor New Internationalist magazine, UK)

Wednesday 7 December 2-4 pm

PANEL - GE Trees, Carbon offset plantations and global warming. Genetically engineered trees are being touted as part of way to solve global warming. Far from a miracle solution, however, genetically engineered trees have the potential to exacerbate global warming. The contamination of native forests with engineered traits will damaged these ecosystems, accelerating tree mortality. Additionally, plantations are rapidly replacing native forests, diminishing the carbon sequestering potential of the land. Global Justice Ecology Project and the STOP GE Trees Campaign will discuss the details of this flawed approach to addressing the climate crisis.Speakers: Anne Petermann (Global Justice Ecology Project, US) and STOP GE Trees Campaign

Contact: Heidi Bachram at heidi@carbontradewatch.org or Graham Erion at graham@erion.ca for more information.

Des efforts seront faits de fournir la traduction française quand necessaries