Arguments for a new left

Answering the free market right

24 October 2007

Drawing an alternative view of knowledge from the practice of social movements, Wainwright establishes a new understanding of transformative political agency as self-consciously experimental and involving a combination of representative and participatory forms of democracy.

Drawing an alternative view of knowledge from the practice of social movements (from the 1968 student revolt, through militant shop stewards’ organisations and the women’s movement, to the peace and green activism of the 1980s) as well as from new philosophical currents, Wainwright counters Hayek’s individualism and denial of the legitimacy of collective action, with a conception of knowledge as fundamentally social. On this foundation she establishes a new understanding of transformative political agency as self-consciously experimental and involving a combination of representative and participatory forms of democracy.

Preface
The arguments: a new left and the democratisation of knowledge

  1. An eastern challenge to the western left
    1. Encounters in the new Europe
  2. At the heart of the challenge
    1. Frederick Hayek and the social-engineering state
    2. Transformation from below
    3. The theory and politics of knowledge
  3. Knew kinds of knowledge for new forms of democracy
    1. From social movement to self-management: a case study from the women’s movement
    2. From grass-roots organising to new economic networks
    3. From extra-parliamentary opposition to parties of a new kind
  4. Why movements matter in the new Europe
    1. Ending the Cold War
    2. Conclusions: transforming governability
October 2007
Blackwell Publishers (eds.)

About the authors

Hilary Wainwright

Hilary Wainwright is a leading researcher and writer on the emergence of new forms of democratic accountability within parties, movements and the state. She is the driving force and editor behind Red Pepper, a popular British new left magazine, and has documented countless examples of resurgent democratic movements from Brazil to Britain and the lessons they provide for progressive politics.

As well as TNI fellow, she is also Senior Research Associate at the International Centre for Participation Studies at the Department for Peace Studies, University of Bradford, UK and Senior Research Associate at International Centre for Participation Studies', Bradford University. She has also been a visiting Professor and Scholar at the University of California, Los Angeles; Havens Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison and Todai University, Tokyo. Her books include Reclaim the State: Experiments in Popular Democracy (Verso/TNI, 2003) and Arguments for a New Left: Answering the Free Market Right (Blackwell, 1993).

Wainwright founded the Popular Planning Unit of the Greater London Council during the Thatcher years, and was convenor of the new economics working group of the Helsinki Citizens’ Assembly from 1989 to 1994.\

Follow Hilary on twitter: @HilaryPepper

 

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