Drinking Water Protests

Drinking Water Protests in Egypt and the Role of Civil Society

17 July 2012
Abdel-Mawla Ismail

From the second half of 2007 till January 2008, Egypt has witnessed a wave of about 40 protests· about the absence of basic rights with relation to drinking water. This shows that thirst protests or intifadas, as some people have called them, started to represent a new path for a social movement that accompanies protests to obtain bread.

From the second half of 2007 till January 2008, Egypt has witnessed a wave of about 40 protests· about the absence of basic rights with relation to drinking water. This shows that thirst protests or intifadas, as some people have called them, started to represent a new path for a social movement that accompanies protests to obtain bread.

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