Untangling the trade talks

What are the likely consequences of an EU-US trade deal for our environment?

17 April 2014

A debate about the impacts of the Investor to States Disputes Settlement on the environment, between representatives from the European Commission and Civil Society Organizations from Europe, US and Canada was held in Brussels during the last negotiations round of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership

Transnational Institute, together with Friends of the Earth and the Seattle to Brussels Network, plus representatives of the European Parliament and Commission, consumers and citizen groups from both sides of the Atlantic, shared perspectives on the likely impacts of a deal on our environment.

The event coincided with the fourth round of trade negotiations on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), in Brussels 10th – 14th March. 

This panel debate was a space for a frank exchange of views on the introduction of special rights for companies in the TTIP, through the mechanism of investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS). Questions such as: How has the ISDS system been used in relation to the environment in existing trade agreements? What can be learned from precedent cases? How would including such rights threaten our environment? were discussed.

Speakers:

-       Rupert Schlegelmilch, European Commission, Directorate General for Trade

-       Višnar Malinovská, European Commission, Directorate General for Environment

-       Ilana Solomon, Sierra Club

-       Stuart Trew, Council of Canadians

-       Pia Eberhardt, Corporate Europe Observatory

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