International Drug Policy Consortium

6 July 2009

IDPC is a global network of national and international NGOs that specialise in issues related to illegal and legal drug use. Its members have come together to pool knowledge and contacts to advocate for more humane and effective drug policies at national and international level. IDPC is TNI's main partner in the sense that all our other main partners are part of the consortium as well.

IDPC is a global network of national and international NGOs that specialise in issues related to illegal and legal drug use. Its members have come together to pool knowledge and contacts to advocate for more humane and effective drug policies at national and international level. IDPC is TNI's main partner in the sense that all our other main partners are part of the consortium as well.

Recent publications from Drugs and Democracy

Towards a Healthier Legal Environment

Since the current drug laws were enacted several important changes have taken place inside and outside of Myanmar. The decision of the Myanmar Government to review the law is not only timely but also offers a prospect to improve the drugs legislation and to ensure that the laws address drug-related problems in the country more effectively.

Mexico: Challenging Drug Prohibition from Below

The horrific forced disappearance of 43 students in Iguala reveals how organised crime and corruption thrive in conditions of institutional or democratic weakness, shaped to a large extent by distinctive transnational relations (importantly, in this case, with the US). Fortunately groups like the Movement for Peace with Justice and Dignity are showing a burgeoning ‘social power‘ that has the potential to change politics and policy.

image[node-id]

Fixing a broken system

Despite efforts by governments in Latin America, illicit drugs continue to provide one of the largest incomes for criminal organizations, enabling them to penetrate and corrupt political and social institutions.

image[node-id]

The International Drug Control Regime and Access to Controlled Medicines

In poor and developing nations pain remains largely uncontrolled. Africa is the least well served continent for access to analgesia.