The World Crisis - and beyond

Conference on alternatives and transformation paths to overcome the regime of crisis-capitalism

28 October 2009
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The multiple crises of the capitalist world economy give the left the unique opportunity to discuss and promote ideas of transformative steps and social alternatives. Which conditions for a post-capitalist world do already exist and what are our responses to this development?

Conference reader coorganised by TNI and Rosa Luxemburg Foundation with contributions and inputs by TNI fellows Hilary Wainwright, Dot Keet, Susan George and Walden Bello.

October 2009
170 pages

About the authors

Dot Keet

Dot Keet is a South African academic and activist involved in many national, African and international networks resisting corporate "free trade" agreements.  She is an active member of the national South African Trade Strategy Group (TSG) and the Southern African Peoples Solidarity Network (SAPSN), the key coordinator of the Southern African Social Forum (SASF); as well as the continent-wide Africa Trade Network (ATN); and the international Our World is Not for Sale (OWINFS) network.

Recent publications from Alternative Regionalisms

De kracht van pleiten en beïnvloeden

Pleiten en beïnvloeden is geen one size fits all-aanpak; het vraagt om complementariteit en mondiale samenwerking van organisaties en vooral ook om uithoudingsvermogen. Maar dan heb je ook wat! Aan de hand van 10 succesfactoren deelt de Fair, Green and Global Alliantie haar ervaringen.

Susan George Classics

The Transnational Institute brings together Susan George’s oeuvre in this beautiful handmade boxed set of her six classic books.

Doing away with ‘labour’

Conventionally, the concept of ‘labour’ is understood as referring to waged labour – the capacity to labour as exercised through a market. It was precisely this narrow understanding of labour that the discussions in this stream challenged from several angles.

Rethinking regionalisms in times of crises

The demand for people-centred regional alternatives has been at the core of people’s struggles in Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe. This reader pulls together perspectives of social movement activists, describing the restrictive regional spaces within which they work and propose regional alternatives.