South East Asia

Farmer by Farmer, an Organic Transition

Robin Broad
February 2011

After decades of chemicals, farmers in the Philippines are seeing the benefits of organic farming. But what convinced them to make the switch in the first place?

Philippines: Food for a Rooted Future

Robin Broad
January 2011

The successful initiatives of farmers to take back control of their lives and gain food security are empowering communities in the Philippines and around the world.

A Changing Ethnic Landscape: Analysis of Burma's 2010 Polls

December 2010

"Burma is at a critical juncture in its history. The transition to a form of civilian government and constitutional rule is underway, however imperfect it may be."

Unlevel Playing Field: Burma’s Election Landscape

September 2010

"Opposition parties participating in the process view boycotting the elections as a strategic mistake. The only way forward for them is to play a better game of chess, making the best strategic use of the limited space available."

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Southeast Asia Informal Drug Policy Dialogue 2010, Bangkok

August 2010

Final report on the Southeast Asian Informal Drug Policy Dialogue, an initiative of TNI and the German Technical Cooperation (GTZ), that took place in Bangkok, 2010.

Burma’s 2010 Elections: Challenges and Opportunities

June 2010

The election process in Burma represents the most significant political transformation for a generation

Burma in 2010: A Critical Year in Ethnic Politics

June 2010

Resolution of Burma's longstanding ethnic crises is integral to the achievement of real peace, democracy and constitutional government

The battle for Thailand

May 2010

Behind the deaths, military repression and violence that has flared up on the streets of Bangkok lies another story of a country following the dictates of the IMF and the markets, which increased inequalities and unemployment for many Thais and created the resentment that will continue to fuel conflict in Thailand.

La corrupción y la trampa de la pobreza en el Tercer Mundo

May 2010

 

La máxima "corrupción-causante-de-pobreza" se ha convertido en una herramienta frecuente en el hegemónico kit discursivo de los líderes de los países en vías de desarrollo. A pesar de que en la práctica resulta que las políticas económicas neoliberales son realmente las  culpables de la pobreza, asegura Waldon Bello. Sin embargo, los "camisas rojas" en Tailandia no se dejan distraer por la línea de "corrupción" que marcan el Banco Mundial y el FMI. Todo lo contrario; han decidido mantener su mirada en el objetivo (la verdadera respuesta a la pobreza) y luchar por que las políticas económicas a favor del pueblo sustituyan al neoliberalismo.

Is Corruption the Cause? The Poverty Trap

May 2010

The “corruption-causes-poverty” narrative has become a standard tool in the hegemonic discourse kit for leaders in some developing countries - where in fact, Waldon Bello argues, it is neoliberal economic policies that are really to blame for poverty. Thailand’s “Red Shirts” are not, however, being distracted by the “corruption” line the World Bank and IMF are pushing, choosing instead to keep their eyes on the prize - the real answer to poverty - replacing neoliberalism with pro-people economic policies.

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