Walden Bello has been declared one of the "stars in our human cosmos" by the 2003 jury of the Right Livelihood Award, known as the Alternative Nobel Prize. He will be honoured at the Swedish Parliament on 8 December 2003.

17 November 2005
Article
 
Walden Bello in Doha

Walden Bello has been declared one of the "stars in our human cosmos" by the 2003 jury of the Right Livelihood Award, known as the Alternative Nobel Prize. He will be honoured at the Swedish Parliament on 8 December 2003.

Webcast of the ceremony will be archived on this site soon

Walden Bello's acceptance speech

Walden and Nicanor Perlas from the Philippines are being honoured "for their outstanding efforts in educating civil society about the effects of corporate globlaisaiton, and how alternatives to it can be implemented". The other two recipients for the cash award in 2003 are the Citizens' Coalition for Economic Justice (South Korea), who have worked for a just, inclusive and democratic economic development, and SEKEM (Egypt), which is seen to epitomise "how a modern business can combine profitability with engagement in world markets with a humane and spiritual approach to people and respect for the natural environment". The honorary award went to New Zealand's former Prime Minister David Lange, recognised for "his steadfast work ... for a world free of nuclear weapons".

The Right Livelihood Awards to Pioneers for a Saner World was established in 1980 by Jakob von Uexkull, a former member of the European Parliament and philatelist, who sold his valuable postage stamps to provide the original endowment. Von Ueskull felt that today's Nobel Prizes, originally intended to "honour those whose work brought to the greatest benefit to humanity", ignored much work and knowledge vital for our world and future, and thus he established the Alternative Nobel Prizes.

Right Livelihood Awardees of the past include Brazilian Leonardo Boff (2000); Spain's Joan Garcés (1999) for his efforts to bring General Augusto Pinochet to justice; Thai "development monk" Sulak Sivaraksa (1995); Nigeria's martyred Ken Saro Wiwa (1994) and India's Vandana Shiva (1993).

See also TNI's Walden Bello page