Search results

12 items
  1. Land for the few Infographics

    • Timothé Feodoroff, Sylvia Kay
    05 December 2016
    Infograph

    A series of infographics that expose the massive concentration of land in Europe. Over the last decade, the EU has lost a third of all its small farms, 3% of its farms now own 52% of farm land, and land inequality has become worse than wealth inequality.

  2. Land grabbing and land concentration in Europe

    • Sylvia Kay
    04 December 2016
    Policy briefing

    Europe’s young and aspiring farmers will face increasing barriers to entry as land is rapidly concentrated in relatively few big farms. Land is even more unevenly distributed than wealth. A steep decline in Europe’s small farms is underway with damaging consequences for food security, employment, and development.

  3. Cooling the planet: Frontline communities lead the struggle

    29 November 2016
    Report

    Communities of small scale food producers are increasingly confronted by the grabbing of natural resources and systematic violations of human rights.

  4. Human Rights vs Property Rights

    21 November 2016
    Paper

    This new report shows how the 'rights-based approach' to fisheries governance is in fact a mechanism for depriving indigenous and subsistence fisherfolk of their traditional waters and transferring them to corporations and economic elites. It must be replaced with a human rights approach.

  5. Blue Growth and Ocean Grabbing: A Historical Materialist Perspective on Fisheries in East Africa

    • Florian Doerr
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    The concepts of “accumulation by dispossession” and “ocean grabbing” are applied to East Africa in order to explain the ongoing dispossession of small scale fisheries. The emergence of a corporate (sea) food regime can be traced, posing challenges for terrestrial food sovereignty via land grabbing and ocean grabbing.

  6. Land Confiscations and Collective Action in Myanmar’s Dawei Special Economic Zone Area: Implications for Rural Democratization

    • Yukari Sekine
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    The recent political and economic liberalization in Burma/Myanmar, while indicative of some positive steps toward democratisation, has increased foreign and domestic investments and geared the economy toward industrialisation and large-scale agriculture. Land governance procedures and implementation tend to favour the more powerful and well-connected, with little protection mechanism for the majority smallholding farmers in the country.

  7. Large-scale forest plantations for climate change mitigation? New frontiers of deforestation and land grabbing in Cambodia

    • Arnim Scheidel, Courtney Work
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    The desperate search for ways to combat climate change gives rise to new mitigation policies and projects, such as the support of large-scale ‘sustainable ’ forestry plantations. However, climate justice and climate mitigation cannot be met as long as large-scale industrial plantations continue to marginalise small-scale indigenous forest users who actively protect biodiverse forests.

  8. Blue Carbon: Ocean Grabbing in Disguise?

    • Mads Barbesgaard
    01 February 2016
    Policy issue

    Will blue carbon projects have similar consequences for coastal communities as the negative socio-ecological impact from the market-based mitigation efforts on land (REDD-ii)

  9. The Meaning of Land in Myanmar

    • Jennifer Franco, Hannah Twomey, Khu Khu Ju, Pietje Vervest, Tom Kramer
    28 January 2016
    Primer

    “Land is like our vein; it is vital for our living. After our land was confiscated, we don’t know what to do for our livelihood,” says a farmer from Kachin State in Myanmar. Today many inhabitants of rural communities in Myanmar live under threat of losing their lands in a battle for resources spurred by ethnic conflict, exploitative land laws, and powerful economic actors. The existence of a legal right to the land does not translate into that right being respected in practice, and people across the country are now working to protect their right to the land.