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5 items
  1. Visit to Brazilian bio-ethanol plant

    EU bioenergy use: the invisible social and environmental harms

    Katie Sandwell, Lyda Fernanda Forero
    08 December 2016
    Article

    The EU's reputation for clean and sustainable energy conceals a dirtier reality, particularly where renewable energy policies and development are driven by corporate interests. Today, nearly two thirds of all “renewable” energy in the EU comes from bio-energy. Although bio-energy appears to provide a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, there are serious questions about its actual emissions profile, and about environmental and social conflicts which are created or exacerbated by the industrial-scale production of biomass to meet European energy needs.

  2. A bioenergy sorghum crop is harvested near College Station. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo)

    Bioenergy in the EU

    • Bente Hessellund Andersen
    08 December 2016
    Report

    The European Union’s approach to bioenergy is shaped by contradictory policies. Climate concerns are highlighted in public discourse and assure broad public support for renewable energy, including bioenergy. Meanwhile, however, the EU’s corporate growth and trade agenda promotes the use of energy that actually increases the EU’s footprint on land elsewhere, with significant implications for environmental and social justice.

  3. Advocates for sustainable palm oil are ignoring human rights violations in Latin America

    Doug Hertzler
    20 September 2016
    Article

    A false picture of a sustainable industry was painted for investors and other participants, last month at the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) , which ignores the harmful impacts of the aggressive expansion of the palm oil industry on local communities

  4. What makes the reformed Committee on World Food Security potentially attractive?

    Nora McKeon
    22 April 2016
    Multi-media

    The Committee for World Food Security is a privileged observation point to reflect on how global food governance and social mobilization intersect.

  5. Flexibilising global agri-biomass value chains: a techno-market fix for resource burdens?

    • Les Levidow
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    An eco-efficient bioeconomy, combining environmental sustainability and economic advantage, has been promoted to alleviate resource constraints of rising global demand. For political forces resisting environmental degradation and people’s dispossession, several means are necessary to contest this global agenda and counterpose alternatives.