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    Hora de acordar

    • Pien Metaal, Anthony Henman *
    26 December 2014

    O quadro de referência essencialmente químico adotado pela Convenção Única das Nações Unidas é equivocado na forma culturalmente enviesada e falsamente "científica" em que foi aplicado a diferentes plantas. Com a proliferação de novas substâncias estimulantes - muitas delas baseadas em plantas usadas em contextos culturais "tradicionais" em diferentes partes do mundo - surgiu a necessidade de se monitorar não apenas as substâncias em si, mas também os contextos sociais em que estas estão sendo utilizadas.

  2. Time for a Wake-up Call: An historical and ethnographic approach to the Regulation of Plant-based Stimulants

    • Pien Metaal, Anthony Henman
    20 December 2014
    Policy briefing

    The chemically-based frame of reference adopted by the UN Single Convention is mistaken in the culturally loaded and falsely “scientific” manner in which it was applied to different plants.

  3. European policy on khat

    • Joanne Csete
    30 April 2014

    The UK and the Netherlands commissioned distinguished scholars and experts to study the social and clinical harms of khat. These experts argued that any harms associated with khat did not require a criminal law response. In rejecting that conclusion and banning khat, these two governments have created an enabling environment for organized criminal networks and may exacerbate racial discrimination in drug law enforcement. Moreover, these policies put in danger the livelihood of thousands of people in some of the world’s lowest-income settings.

  4. acmd-khat-2013

    Khat: A review of its potential harms to the individual and communities in the UK

    23 January 2013

    On the basis of the available evidence, the overwhelming majority of Council members consider that khat should not be controlled under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. In summary the reason for this is that, save for the issue of liver toxicity, although there may be a correlation or association between the use of khat and various negative social indicators, it is not possible to conclude that there is any causal link.

  5. Rumiando la prohibición del khat

    • Martin Jelsma, Pien Metaal, Axel Klein
    16 February 2012
    Policy briefing

    El khat se ha consumido durante miles de años en las tierras altas del África oriental y el sur de Arabia. Las estrictas prohibiciones del khat impuestas en Europa para la supuesta protección de las comunidades inmigrantes han tenido graves consecuencias negativas.

  6. Rumiando la prohibición del khat

    • Martin Jelsma, Pien Metaal, Axel Klein
    18 January 2012

    En el marco de un mercado de ‘euforizantes legales’ muy dinámico y bien documentado, el caso del khat (también escrito ‘qat’, Catha edulis) ofrece una interesante anomalía. Se trata, en primer lugar, de una sustancia derivada de una planta que se somete a un procesamiento o transformación mínima en el recorrido entre el campo y el mercado. Y en segundo, el khat se ha consumido durante cientos –si no miles– de años en las tierras altas del África oriental y el sur de Arabia. En los países europeos, el consumo de khat se observó por primera vez durante la década de 1980, pero sólo ha suscitado una mayor atención en los últimos años.

     

  7. Chewing over Khat prohibition

    • Martin Jelsma, Pien Metaal, Axel Klein
    10 January 2012

    In the context of a fast changing and well documented market in legal highs, the case of khat (Catha edulis) provides an interesting anomaly. It is first of all a plant-based substance that undergoes minimal transformation or processing in the journey from farm to market. Secondly, khat has been consumed for hundreds if not thousands of years in the highlands of Eastern Africa and Southern Arabia. In European countries, khat use was first observed during the 1980s, but has only attracted wider attention in recent years.

  8. Expert Seminar on Herbal Stimulants and Legal Highs

    30 October 2011
    A grey area has emerged between what is legal and what is not as states struggle with how to respond to the many new synthetic compounds emerging onto the market. Of the various types of ‘Legal highs’ the seminar focused on stimulants because of the parallels with the other main drug-policy issue of the moment; i.e. the status of traditional herbal stimulants. These older discussions have been reinvigorated by: Bolivia’s efforts to de-schedule coca-leaf at UN level; the debates on the status of khat between EU States, and of kratom across Asia; and the increasing stride of legitimate cannabis use on the domestic front, as in for example Spain.
  9. Khat use in Europe

    01 July 2011
    Khat leaves are cultivated in the highlands of the Horn of Africa, Southern Arabia and along the East African coast. In many countries, chewing khat is an age-old tradition. More recently, the mass migration of people from the Horn of Africa has been associated with the spread of khat usage to neighbouring countries, Europe and the rest of the world. Exact numbers of regular khat users on a worldwide scale do not exist, however estimates range up to 20 million. This paper presents the challenges associated with the spread of khat consumption.
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    El consumo de khat en Europa

    01 July 2011

    khat-drugsinfocus-sLas hojas de khat se cultivan en las regiones montañosas del Cuerno de África, en el sur de la península arábiga y a lo largo de la costa este de África. Desde hace siglos, en algunas partes del Cuerno de África mascan las hojas de khat debido a los efectos ligeramente estimulantes que, para muchos, constituyen un referente habitual de la vida en sociedad. Más recientemente, la masiva migración de poblaciones procedentes del Cuerno de África ha contribuido a extender el consumode khat a países limítrofes, a Europa y al resto del mundo.

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  11. East African discourses on khat and sex

    • Susan Beckerleg
    01 September 2010
    The study aims to review and analyse the varied East African discourses on the effects of khat use on libido, fertility, transmission of HIV, prostitution and rape. Khat is associated, by consumers and its detractors alike, with changes in libido and sexual performance. Although there is no evidence to support their claims, detractors of khat use argue that khat causes sexual violence, causes women to enter sex work, and that chewing causes the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, including the HIV virus.
  12. A good chew or good riddance

    • Pien Metaal, Axel Klein
    15 July 2010
    The article reviews the status of khat, the most recent plant based psychoactive substance to reach a global market, and considers policy making processes in general and the framework of drug control in particular. The risk assessment and classification of psychoactive drugs is a contested arena where political, economic and moral agendas collide, leaving countries that have banned khat, with significant social costs. To best manage the risks arising from the increasing availability of khat it is therefore suggested to draft a regulatory framework with clear objectives and guiding principles.
  13. Khat use and monitoring drug use in Europe

    • Paul Griffiths, Dominique Lopez, Roumen Sedefov, Ana Gallegos, Brendan Hughes, André Noor, Luis Royuela
    07 May 2010

    The aim of the study was to review the information available on the use of khat (Catha edulis) in the EU, and to assess the future use of this drug and related substances. Khat use sits awkwardly within the current EU reporting framework, and this hampers the production of a European-level analysis of the use of this drug. Why this is so, and what information is available at the European level, are the topics addressed in this paper. The analysis is extended to consider if the current evidence suggests that this drug, or synthetic variations of the psychoactive compounds it contains, are likely to play a greater role in the European drug scene of the future.

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  14. The changing use and misuse of khat

    • Michael Odenwald, Nasir Warfa, Axel Klein (eds.)
    07 May 2010
    Within the last decade the hitherto little known psychoactive substance of khat has emerged as a regional and international issue. In the Horn of Africa khat production has spurred an economic boom, but dramatic increases in consumption have raised public health concerns. Given the complexity of the topic spanning multiple academic disciplines and fields of professional practice, the need for a systematic overview is urgent.
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    Regulating khat

    • Axel Klein, Susan Beckerleg, Degol Hailu
    01 November 2009

    The regulation of khat, one of the most recent psychoactive drugs to become a globally traded commodity, remains hotly contested within different producer and consumer countries. As regimes vary, it has been possible to compare khat policies in Africa, Europe and North America from different disciplinary perspectives. The research established the significance of khat for rural producers, regional economies, as a tax base and source of foreign exchange. At the same time, khat as a psychoactive substance is associated with health and public safety problems that in turn are met with often ill-informed legislative responses. Bans have in turn lead to the criminalisation of users and sellers and illegal drug markets.

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  16. Risk assessment of khat use in the Netherlands

    • E.J.M. Pennings, A. Opperhuizen, J.G.C. van Amsterdam
    22 August 2008
    Paper

    In preparing a decision about the legal status of khat in the Netherlands, the Dutch Minister of Health requested CAM (Coordination point Assessment and Monitoring new drugs) to assess the overall risk of khat in the Netherlands. The present paper is a redraft of a report which formed the scientific basis of the risk evaluation procedure (October 2007). This report reviews the scientific data about khat available in the international literature. In addition, the report contains some information specific for the Netherlands (prevalence, availability of khat and public order aspects).

  17. Should Khat Be Banned?

    • Degol Hailu, Policy Specialist, UNDP, Caribbean
    01 July 2007

    The global trade in khat is controversial. The United States and most countries in Europe have banned it, considering it a psychotropic substance. But it contributes significantly to farmers’ livelihood in Eastern Africa. Though public officials in the region denounce its consumption, they benefit from the foreign exchange and tax revenues that it generates. So, how should this contradiction be resolved?

     

  18. Yemen: Towards Qat Demand Reduction

    01 June 2007

    This report, based on a household survey conducted in 2006, discusses options for discouraging qat consumption in Yemen. It draws on a survey - the first representative data collection exercise aimed specifically at assessing the qat consumption phenomena - which confirms that the use of this drug is widespread. Qat is consumed by men, women and children; its use is extremely time consuming; it drains the family budget; has adverse health effects; negatively affects work performance and thus contributes to poverty.