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105 items
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    Failed and Collapsed States in the International System

    TNI / African Studies Centre (Leiden) / the Center of Social Studies (Coimbra University) / CIP-FUHEM (Madrid)
    01 December 2003
    Article
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    State Terrorism and September 11, 1973 & 2001

    Roger Burbach
    11 September 2003
    Article
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    The New York State Adult Drug Court Evaluation

    • Michael Rempel et. al.
    01 October 2003

    ny-drug-courtsBy combining drug treatment with ongoing judicial supervision, drug courts seek to break the cycle of addiction, crime, and repeat incarceration. While practice varies widely from state to state (and county to county), the outlines of the drug court model are clear: addicted offenders are linked to treatment; their progress is monitored by a drug court team composed of the judge, attorneys, and program staff; participants engage in direct interaction with the judge, who responds to progress and setbacks with a range of rewards and sanctions; and successful participants generally have the charges against them dismissed or reduced, while those who fail receive jail or prison sentences.

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    Drugs in the UN system

    • Martin Jelsma
    01 April 2003

    The "international community" presented an apparent unanimity in its endorsement of prohibitive drug control at the United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on drugs in 1998. The reality is that there is a longstanding conflict within the UN system between nations wanting to maintain the prohibition regime and those hoping for a more pragmatic approach.

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    Conference in "Gigantinho"

    Susan George
    25 January 2003
    Article
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    HIV/AIDS and Drugs Misuse in Russia

    • William E Butler
    01 September 2003

    hivaids-russiaThis report breaks new ground in the HIV/AIDS prevention literature by reviewing harm reduction initiatives and programmes in the context of Russian and international law. The intention is to guide the reader through the complexities of the laws governing HIV and drug misuse and to determine the various legal difficulties relating to these initiatives. The policy options that appear to be available to address them and to allow harm reduction programmes to become an integral part of Russia’s response to its HIV/AIDS epidemic are set out. With the intensification of the “harm reduction versus drug supply/demand reduction” debate there is a need to ensure that policy makers have a thorough understanding of the concept of harm reduction, related terminology and relevant aspects of the law.

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    The Stalemate in Iraq and the Global Peace Movement

    Walden Bello
    02 April 2003
    Article
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    Global Trends in Drug Policies: Lessons from Vienna

    Martin Jelsma
    20 June 2003
    Article

    Paper presented at the Social Forum in Cartagena (Colombia), 20 June 2003.

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    Drugs and Conflict in Burma (Myanmar)

    • Martin Jelsma, Pietje Vervest, Tom Kramer
    15 December 2003
    Policy briefing

    This issue of Drugs & Conflict tries to bring nuance to the polarised debate on the Rangoon-focussed political agenda, the demonising of the ceasefire groups and repressive drug policy approaches.

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    "Lula: There's Nothing to Gain in Davos"

    Susan George
    24 January 2003
    Article
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    Springtime in Baghdad

    Walden Bello
    16 March 2003
    Article
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    Porto Alegre in Cannes

    Car los Atílio T odeschini -DMAE General Director
    23 June 2003
    Article
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    TNI: Cracks in the Vienna consensus

    17 April 2003

    In a first analysis of the outcomes of the 2003 UNGASS mid-term review in April 2003, TNI concluded that the outcomes were very disappointing. The absence of significant progress over the past five years had not led to self-reflection and evaluation. The goals and targets of the UNGASS were simply re-affirmed. Most countries concentrated on a stock taking halfway of the implemented measures, without an honest analysis of the impact. The result is a distorted picture of virtual progress in order to justify to stay on the same course. The illusion is kept alive that reality will somehow fall into line with wishful thinking.

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    WTO Ministerial Collapses in Cancún

    Walden Bello
    14 September 2003
    Article
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    Iraqis will not be pawns in Bush and Blair's war game

    Kamil Mahdi
    20 February 2003
    Article
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    Forward Operating Locations in Latin America

    • Tom Blickman, Martin Jelsma, Pien Metaal, Amira Armenta, Virginia Montañés, Theo Roncken
    19 September 2003
    Policy briefing

    This issue of Drugs & Conflict explains the background to and operation of the US Forward Operating Locations (FOLs) in Ecuador, El Salvador and Aruba/Curacao, established since 1999.

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    What is the Point of Porto Alegre? Activists from Two Generations in Dialogue

    Susan George, Debate between Ezequiel Adamovsky
    21 January 2003
    Article
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    The role of the quantity in the prosecution of drug offences

    01 April 2003

    publicationAll countries use legal or judicial means to grade the severity of the offence of drug possession and related actions. Frequently this is done by reference to the quantity of drugs involved in the offence, and some countries choose to indicate certain quantities as the threshold between the levels of offence or punishment. This paper examines whether or not such quantities are defined in the various EU Member States and Norway and, if so, how.

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    The Unwritten History of the 1998 United Nations General Assembly Special Session on Drugs

    Martin Jelsma
    01 April 2003
    Article

    A myriad of documents and records of meetings published by the UN, reveal a previously unwritten history of events leading to the 1998 UNGASS meeting. These show the extent to which the hardliners have gone to maintain the status quo through rhetoric, denial, manipulation, selective presentation, misrepresentation and suppression of evidence, selective use of experts, threats to funding, and purging "defeatists" from the UN system.

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