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    The Politics of Glyphosate

    01 June 2005
    Policy briefing

    The Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD), an agency affiliated with the OAS, recently joined the large number of existing scientific studies on the possible health and environmental effects of Round Up, the glyphosate formula being sprayed on illicit crops in Colombia. CICAD’s investigation, under the direction of an international scientific team, concluded that the chemicals used in the spraying — glyphosate and Cosmo-Flux — do not affect human health or the environment, and that at most they could cause temporary skin and eye irritation, but serious doubts exist. The National University of Colombia’s Environmental Studies Institute published a critical analysis of the CICAD study, which considered technical aspects of the investigation, finding methodological shortcomings, as well as omissions and inconsistencies throughout the report. Those findings could point to a lack of impartiality in the CICAD study.

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    Global Trends in Drugs: Related websites and documents

    17 November 2005
    Article

    Useful links to recommended resources on global trends in drug usage

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    Trouble in the Triangle

    • Martin Jelsma, Pietje Vervest, Tom Kramer
    22 July 2005
    Book

    A collection of ten papers that analyse the relationship between drugs and conflict in Burma and the consequences of the Burmese illicit drugs economy for neighbouring countries.

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    Drugs and Conflict in Burma

    01 December 2005
    Article

    Burma

    Burma

    Burma/Myanmar is undergoing yet another humanitarian crisis while entering a new critical political stage. In the Kokang region, an opium ban was enforced in 2003, and since mid-2005 no more poppy growing has been allowed in the Wa region. Banning opium in these Shan State regions where most of the Burmese opiates were produced, adds another chapter to the long and dramatic history of drugs, conflict and human suffering.

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    Broken Promises and Coca Eradication in Peru

    03 March 2005
    Policy briefing

    The forced crop eradication policy implemented by the Peruvian government over the past 25 years has failed. The official strategy has exacerbated social conflicts; contributed to various types of subversive violence; jeopardized local economies, also affecting the national economy; and destroyed forests as crops have become more scattered. Worst of all, it has not resolved any of the underlying causes of drug trafficking, such as poverty, marginalisation and government neglect.

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    Synthetic Drugs: Related websites and documents

    Drugs and Democracy
    17 November 2005
    Article
    Recommended web resources on synthetic drugs
  7. Broken promises and coca eradication in Peru

    • Ricardo Soberon
    01 March 2005

    The forced crop eradication policy implemented by the Peruvian government over the past 25 years has failed. The official strategy has exacerbated social conflicts; contributed to various types of subversive violence; jeopardized local economies, also affecting the national economy; and destroyed forests as crops have become more scattered. Worst of all, it has not resolved any of the underlying causes of drug trafficking, such as poverty, marginalisation and government neglect.

     

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    Afghanistan: Drugs overview

    17 November 2005
    Article

    Afghanistan is the world's largest producer of opium, the raw material for heroin. In 2000, the Taleban regime enforced an opium ban that led to the virtual disappearance of opium poppy cultivation in areas under their control. In drug control terms, this is often referred to as an unprecedented success, yet the ban caused a major humanitarian disaster for hundreds of thousands dependent on the illicit economy.

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    A Pipe Dream?

    Martin Jelsma
    01 October 2005
    Article
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    Bolivia Drugs Overview

    17 November 2005
    Article

    Bolivia has lived through more than two decades of supply reduction policies, but still figures as the world's third cocaine-producing country.