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6 items
  1. Stepping away from the darkness

    Martin Jelsma
    01 September 2009
    Article

    The experiences of countries that have decriminalised drugs show that fears of explosions in drugs use are unfounded.

  2. Latin America breaks ranks in US war on drugs

    Sara Miller Llana
    24 September 2009
    Article

    Many countries in the region – most recently Mexico – have decriminalized small amounts of drugs for personal use. The moves have followed decisions by left-leaning governments to limit cooperation with the US in recent years.

  3. Mexico decriminalizes small amounts of drugs

    27 August 2009
    Article

    Last week, the Mexican government announced that it will no longer jail users of small amounts of marijuana, cocaine and heroin. Other countries in the region have taken similar steps.

  4. Drugs and Democracy: Toward a Paradigm Shift

    01 February 2009

    The statement presents the main findings of the Latin American Commission on Drugs and Democracy. Prohibitionist policies based on the eradication of production and on the disruption of drug flows as well as on the criminalization of consumption have not yielded the desired results, concludes . We are further than ever from the announced goal of eradicating drugs. Breaking the taboo, acknowledging the failure of current policies and their consequences is the inescapable prerequisite for the discussion of a new paradigm leading to safer, more efficient and humane drug policies.

     

  5. Bolivia calls on Obama to back coca campaign

    11 March 2009
    Other news

    President Barack Obama should recognize traditional uses of the coca leaf because not all production becomes cocaine, Bolivian President Evo Morales said. Morales, a former coca farmer, also called on participants at a United Nations drug policy meeting in Vienna to lift a ban on coca for some uses.

  6. Assessing US Drug Policy in the Americas

    • John Walsh
    15 October 2009

    The growing realization that we and our neighbors in the Americas are not well-served by the status quo U.S. policies presents the opportunity to re-examine old premises and modernize our goals and strategies. Better to make real progress in reducing drug-related harms than to persist with policies that have failed to meet their own basic goals even as they have generated immense collateral damage.