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26 items
  1. «Mettre les marchés sous tutelle»

    Susan George
    22 May 2010

    La Banque centrale européenne doit accepter de prêter à bas taux aux États plutôt que d’avoir recours au FMI.

  2. UK election: No political parties offered "big ideas to match the depth of crises”

    Hilary Wainwright
    14 May 2010

    What we saw in the UK election campaign and the recent coalition deal is the level of opportunism amongst the political parties, and the real absence of politics and ideas on how to deal with major crises in the economy, over climate change and of our political institutions.

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    Programme of the Permanent Peoples' Tribunal, May 2010

    13 May 2010
    Article

    Programme and background to Peoples' Tribunal on "Neoliberal Policies and European Transnational Corporations (TNCs) in Latin America and the Caribbean”.

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    Is Corruption the Cause? The Poverty Trap

    Walden Bello
    11 May 2010
    Article

    The “corruption-causes-poverty” narrative has become a standard tool in the hegemonic discourse kit for leaders in some developing countries - where in fact, Waldon Bello argues, it is neoliberal economic policies that are really to blame for poverty. Thailand’s “Red Shirts” are not, however, being distracted by the “corruption” line the World Bank and IMF are pushing, choosing instead to keep their eyes on the prize - the real answer to poverty - replacing neoliberalism with pro-people economic policies.

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    Russian liberals in their theatre of the absurd

    Boris Kagarlitsky
    11 May 2010
    Article

    Recently invited to an interview at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Boris Kagarlitsky laments the disillusionment of Russian liberals, who think “real capitalism” doesn’t produce crises, while as the crisis deepens, critical voices draw increasing attention among audiences in the West.

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    Beyond the casino state

    Hilary Wainwright
    28 March 2010
    Article

    Still in thrall to neoliberal nostrums, British politicians compete to dismantle the state as a provider of services, leaving its function as primarily a prop to private capital.

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