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37 items
  1. Systems Overload: Drug Laws and Prisons in Latin America

    09 December 2010 - Event

    An unprecedented one-year comparative study of the drug laws and prison systems in eight Latin American countries – Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay – was released on Thursday, December 9, 2010, during a conference with high-level policy analysts and the study's country-researchers at the Universidad de Palermo in Buenos Aires, Argentina, by the Transnational Institute (TNI) and the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA).

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    Binational Conference on Border Issues

    01 December 2010 - Event
  3. II Latin American Conference on Drug Policy

    26 August 2010 - Event

    On 26 and 27 August, 2010, the Second Latin American Conference and the First Brazilian Conference on Drug Policy took place in the noble hall of the National Law School of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) with more than 400 attendees and the presence of top drug policy experts from thirteen countries in Latin America. It was the most specialized meeting to take place to date in the region. The Conference was organized at the regional level by Intercambios, a key Latin American civil association that has worked for fifteen years on issues of harm reduction and drug policy. And, locally by Psicotropicus, a pioneer in bringing the drugs debate out from obscurity and bringing it into everyday discussions in Brazil.

  4. Drug Laws and Prison in Ecuador

    12 July 2010 - Event

    Ecuador has one of the harshest drug laws in the hemisphere. A non-violent drug offender can receive the same sentence, sometimes even stiffer, than a murderer.

  5. Drug Laws and Prison in Mexico

    02 July 2010 - Event

    Over the years, the Mexican government has adopted increasingly heavy prison sentences and militarized drug policies to confront drug trafficking. The result has been an increase of vulnerable populations in Mexico’s prisons, but no impact on the drug trade or violence.

  6. The Vienna Declaration

    29 June 2010
    Declaration

    The Vienna Declaration is a statement seeking to improve community health and safety by calling for the incorporation of scientific evidence into illicit drug policies. We are inviting scientists, health practitioners and the public to endorse this document in order to bring these issues to the attention of governments and international agencies, and to illustrate that drug policy reform is a matter of urgent international significance. We also welcome organizational endorsements.

     

  7. Gaza aid convoy killings: Those responsible must be held criminally accountable

    Richard Falk
    31 May 2010
    Declaration

    Unless prompt and decisive action is taken to challenge the Israeli siege on Gaza, all of us will be complicit in criminal policies.

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    Is Development Aid Nonsense?

    04 June 2010 - Event
  9. The Art of the Possible

    06 May 2010 - Event
  10. The Art of the Possible

    06 May 2010 - Event

    Today, despite a world-wide drug control treaty system and decades of massive investments to attack drug production and curtail supplies and consumption, illicit drug markets and criminal networks are flourishing, threatening public health and safety. The failure of the "war on drugs" is prompting renewed debate and policy innovation in countries across the Americas.

  11. The 2010 Commission on Narcotic Drugs

    30 April 2010 - Event

    The 53rd Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) was a rather uneventful event. After the High Level Segment in 2009, the final agreement on the new Political Declaration and the unprecedented addition of an Interpretative Statement on harm reduction, this year’s CND would be a generally low-key affair. One of the most controversial issues were the comments of the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) on the trend to decriminalize possession for personal use in Argentina, Brazil and Mexico. Both Argentina and Mexico voiced strong objections. This CND also was marked by the imminent departure of Mr. Costa as Executive Director of the nited Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

     

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