Search results

16 items
  1. Conviction by Numbers

    • Genevieve Harris
    27 May 2011

    Threshold quantities (TQs) for drug law and policy are being experimented with across many jurisdictions. States seem attracted to their apparent simplicity and use them to determine, for example, whether: a possession or supply offence is made out (e.g. Greece); a matter should be diverted away from the criminal justice system (e.g. Portugal); or a case should fall within a certain sentencing range (e.g. UK).

     

  2. Book review - Maoist and Other Armed Conflicts.

    Achin Vanaik
    25 May 2011
    Article

    The authors provide a remarkably comprehensive and lucidly written survey of the armed conflicts currently taking place within India.

  3. Expert Seminar on Proportionality of Sentencing for Drug Offences

    20 May 2011
    Policy briefing

    There has in recent years been a renewed interest in the principle of proportionality in sentencing policy for drug offences. There has been official analysis of the issue by the International Narcotics Control Board (‘INCB’) and several national initiatives that have emphasised a requirement for proportionality when sentencing in statute or penal code, asserted it through the courts, or, as with the UK Consultation on sentencing for drug offences, are continuing to explore the concept through policy processes.

  4. Expert Seminar on Proportionality of Sentencing for Drug Offences

    20 May 2011
    Report

    There has in recent years been a renewed interest in the principle of proportionality in sentencing policy for drug offences. There has been official analysis of the issue by the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) and several national initiatives that have inscribed a requirement for proportionality when sentencing in statute or penal code, asserted it through the courts, or, as with the UK Consultation on sentencing for drug offences by the Sentencing Council of England and Wales, are continuing to explore the concept through policy processes.

     

  5. Taking Drugs Seriously

    • Jonathan Birdwell, Jake Chapman, Nicola Singleton
    17 May 2011

    Since first coming to public prominence at the end of 2009, legal highs have posed a major challenge to existing legal and legislative structures designed to deal with drugs. With the market in manufactured psychoactive substances like mephedrone moving faster than public policy can accommodate, this report asks whether the assumptions enshrined in the 40-year-old Misuse of Drugs Act (MDA) are still valid when applied 21st century drugs market.

     

  6. Abandon the Washington Consensus, forge the Istanbul Consensus

    Susan George
    16 May 2011
    Article

    The world has had more than enough of the Washington Consensus. It’s time to impose an Istanbul Consensus based on common sense, low-cost solutions, public honesty and simple justice and give the people of the LDCs, at last, a chance.

  7. Legal high battle shows need for drugs policy rethink

    16 May 2011
    Other news

    The Demos/UKDPC report Taking Drugs Seriously published today sets out clearly how legal highs have exposed the ancient Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (MDA) as totally inadequate legislation. They propose a whole new range of regulatory controls for the 600 or so drugs (and growing) covered by the act. The report was described by Britain's most senior drugs officer, Chief Constable Tim Hollis, as "a timely and helpful contribution".

  8. Conviction by Numbers

    • Genevieve Harris
    15 May 2011
    Policy briefing

    Threshold quantities (TQs) for drug law and policy are being experimented with across many jurisdictions.

  9. Drug laws and bans on legal highs 'do more harm than good'

    14 May 2011
    Other news

    The UK's "outdated" drug laws could be doing more harm than good and are failing to recognise that banning some "legal highs" may have negative consequences for public health, according to the leading independent panel set up to analyse drugs policy. On the eve of the 40th anniversary of the Misuse of Drugs Act, the UK Drug Policy Commission warns that the exponential rise in "legal highs" and the availability of substances over the internet is making current laws redundant.

  10. Free private Manning: Unmasking the Myth of National Security

    Saul Landau
    12 May 2011
    Article

    Double standards and double speak surround the case of private Manning; the term 'national security' has been used again and again by the government to cover up bureaucratic mistakes and human rights crimes.

  11. India and Pakistan's hope after Osama

    Praful Bidwai
    12 May 2011
    Article

    Bin Laden's demise may mark a turning point in the relationship between India and Pakistan.

  12. Former mayors speak out for Insite

    11 May 2011
    Other news

    Divided by politics but united by drug policy, five former Vancouver mayors have issued a last-minute plea to Ottawa to drop its appeal of earlier court decisions approving Insite, the city’s supervised drug injection site. “Since opening in 2003, Insite has proven – beyond a doubt – its worth to our community,” the five ex-mayors say in an open letter issued to the federal Conservative government. Open letter supporting Insite from Vancouver mayors.

  13. Who will reshape the Arab world: its people, or the US

    Tariq Ali
    05 May 2011
    Article

    Phase one of the Arab spring is over. Phase two – the attempt to crush or contain genuine popular movements – has begun.

  14. Kratom in Thailand: Decriminalisation and Community Control?

    • Pascal Tanguay
    03 May 2011
    Policy briefing

    Kratom is an integral part of Thai culture and has neglible harmful effects. Community level control and education are recommended for the best path to harm reduction.

  15. Controlling and Regulating Drugs

    03 May 2011

    The New Zealand Law Commission was asked to address the efficacy of the Misuse of Drugs Act in reducing the demand for, and supply of, drugs prohibited under the International Drug Conventions. The Commission has recommended the existing Act be repealed and replaced by a new Act administered by the Ministry of Health. Justice Hammond said the thrust of the proposed new Act is to facilitate a more effective interface between the criminal justice and health sectors: “We need to recognise that the abuse of drugs is both a health and a criminal public policy problem.”

     

  16. Review drags drug law into 21st Century

    03 May 2011
    Other news

    New Zealand’s 35-year-old Misuse of Drugs Act should be consigned to the rubbish heap of history and replaced with a modern, flexible, health-focussed law fit for purpose for the 21st Century, said the New Zealand Drug Foundation today. The Drug Foundation was responding to the Law Commission’s recommendations for reforming the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975, which was tabled today in Parliament.  The report makes 144 recommendations for a new legislative and policy approach to reducing the country’s drug problem, and is a result of a comprehensive 2 year review of New Zealand’s obsolete drug law.

    See: New Zealand Law Commission report: Controlling and Regulating Drugs – A Review of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975