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  1. Is Obama finally ready to dial back the war on drugs?

    Jacob Sullum
    31 December 2014
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    As Obama embarks on the third year of his second term, here are some of the ways in which Obama has begun to deliver on his promises of a more rational, less punitive approach to psychoactive substances. Obama's most significant drug policy accomplishment may be letting states go their own way on marijuana legalization. Even if our next president is a Republican drug warrior, he will have a hard time reversing that decision, especially given the GOP’s lip service to federalism.

  2. No, legal US drugs aren’t being trafficked into Mexico en masse

    02 December 2014
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    The US Drug Enforcement Agency has now walked back statements it made about the trafficking of marijuana grown in the US to buyers in Mexico, after being met with skepticism by other law enforcement agents and experts and being pressed to divulge more information on the allegedly burgeoning problem. The claim that Mexican drug cartel members were taking US-grown weed and selling it at a premium to Mexican customers first emerged in a broader NPR report on the effects of legalized marijuana on the illicit drug trade.

  3. The injustice of marijuana arrests

    27 July 2014
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    America’s four-decade war on drugs is responsible for many casualties, but the criminalization of marijuana has been perhaps the most destructive part of that war. The toll can be measured in dollars — billions of which are thrown away each year in the aggressive enforcement of pointless laws. It can be measured in years — whether wasted behind bars or stolen from a child who grows up fatherless. And it can be measured in lives — those damaged if not destroyed by the shockingly harsh consequences that can follow even the most minor offenses.

  4. DEA may be losing the war on marijuana politics

    11 July 2014
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    The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has found itself under attack in Congress as it holds its ground against marijuana legalization while the resolve of longtime political allies — and the White House and Justice Department to which it reports — rapidly fades. How much the agency's stock has fallen was readily apparent in the House debate, when Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.) denounced the agency's longtime chief.

  5. DEA chief: Marijuana legalization just 'makes us fight harder'

    01 April 2014
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    Far from being discouraged by shifts in public opinion, state laws and even within the Obama administration on the legalization of marijuana, federal drug agents are driven to "fight harder," said Drug Enforcement Administration chief Michele Leonhart. Leonhart, who criticized President Obama for comparing marijuana to alcohol during a closed-door meeting, suggested that voters in Washington state and Colorado were duped into legalizing marijuana. The Marijuana Policy Project is calling on the president through a Change.org petition to fire Leonhart.

  6. America’s new drug policy landscape

    01 April 2014
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    Public opinion in the US appears ready for a truce in the war on drugs. A national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that support for the legalization of marijuana use continues to increase. Fully 75% of the public think that the sale and use of marijuana will eventually be legal nationwide. Just as most Americans prefer a less punitive approach to the use of drugs such as heroin and cocaine, an even larger majority (76%) think that people convicted of possessing small amounts of marijuana should not have to serve time in jail.

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    Legalizar la marihuana medicinal no conlleva más delitos en EE UU

    30 March 2014
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    medical-marijuana3Una de las razones fundamentales por la que muchos Estados de Estados Unidos no han legalizado todavía la marihuana para su uso medicinal es por el temor a que hacerlo suponga un aumento de los delitos criminales. Pero un último estudio realizado por la universidad de Texas contradice esta creencia y ha concluido que legalizar la sustancia “no aumenta el número de crímenes e, incluso, reduce los homicidios”. La investigación, publicada en PLOS ONE, abre de nuevo el debate. La marihuana para usos medicinales fue aprobada por primera vez en EE UU en 1996.