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81 items
  1. Hydropower in Myanmar: For Whose Benefit?

    Nang Shining
    16 December 2016
    Article

    Amidst the many challenges Myanmar now faces, the threats to the environment are urgent – and they are growing more extreme. The situation is especially serious in the case of mega dams and hydropower where a host of projects are being promoted, without appropriate planning or public consultation, that are likely to cause irreversible harm to communities and natural ecosystems around the country. Not only are many of the projects located in nationality areas that are conflict zones, but the bulk of the energy produced will also be exported to neighbouring countries.

  2. 4th anniversary “Where is Sombath Somphone?”

    15 December 2016
    Declaration

    Laos: On fourth anniversary of enforced disappearance, civil society demands to know: “Where is Sombath Somphone?”

  3. Call for papers: The future of food and challenges for agriculture in the 21st century

    13 December 2016
    Article

    A call for papers and proposals for workshops as part of the annual colloquium on food and agriculture to be held in 2017 April 24th / 26th in Basque Country. 

  4. Visit to Brazilian bio-ethanol plant

    EU bioenergy use: the invisible social and environmental harms

    Katie Sandwell, Lyda Fernanda Forero
    08 December 2016
    Article

    The EU's reputation for clean and sustainable energy conceals a dirtier reality, particularly where renewable energy policies and development are driven by corporate interests. Today, nearly two thirds of all “renewable” energy in the EU comes from bio-energy. Although bio-energy appears to provide a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, there are serious questions about its actual emissions profile, and about environmental and social conflicts which are created or exacerbated by the industrial-scale production of biomass to meet European energy needs.

  5. A bioenergy sorghum crop is harvested near College Station. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo)

    Bioenergy in the EU

    • Bente Hessellund Andersen
    08 December 2016
    Report

    The European Union’s approach to bioenergy is shaped by contradictory policies. Climate concerns are highlighted in public discourse and assure broad public support for renewable energy, including bioenergy. Meanwhile, however, the EU’s corporate growth and trade agenda promotes the use of energy that actually increases the EU’s footprint on land elsewhere, with significant implications for environmental and social justice.

  6. Land for the few Infographics

    • Timothé Feodoroff, Sylvia Kay
    05 December 2016
    Infograph

    A series of infographics that expose the massive concentration of land in Europe. Over the last decade, the EU has lost a third of all its small farms, 3% of its farms now own 52% of farm land, and land inequality has become worse than wealth inequality.

  7. Land grabbing and land concentration in Europe

    • Sylvia Kay
    04 December 2016
    Policy briefing

    Europe’s young and aspiring farmers will face increasing barriers to entry as land is rapidly concentrated in relatively few big farms. Land is even more unevenly distributed than wealth. A steep decline in Europe’s small farms is underway with damaging consequences for food security, employment, and development.

  8. Donald Trump

    Breaking with Fear

    Nick Buxton
    01 December 2016
    Article

    Trump's obsession with security is not an anomaly, but a reflection of a growing tide of fear-based politics that has also shaped the climate change debate. In an interview about TNI's book, The Secure and the Dispossessed, Nick Buxton reflects on the 'securitisation' of climate change and the need to advocate a just transition.

  9. Cooling the planet: Frontline communities lead the struggle

    29 November 2016
    Report

    Communities of small scale food producers are increasingly confronted by the grabbing of natural resources and systematic violations of human rights.

  10. Human Rights vs Property Rights

    21 November 2016
    Paper

    This new report shows how the 'rights-based approach' to fisheries governance is in fact a mechanism for depriving indigenous and subsistence fisherfolk of their traditional waters and transferring them to corporations and economic elites. It must be replaced with a human rights approach.

  11. Nos terres valent plus que du carbone

    17 November 2016
    Article

    L'Accord de Paris donne pour consigne aux 196 Etats Parties à la Convention Climat des Nations Unies de contenir l'élévation des températures en-dessous de 2° voire 1.5°C par rapport aux niveaux pré-industriels. Si la COP 21 a été l'objet d'une grande mobilisation liée à l’adoption d’un accord international, la COP 22 fait, en revanche, l'objet d'une moindre attention. Pourtant, les enjeux restent prégnants. La COP 22, surnommée « COP de l'action » ou « COP de l'agriculture », risque bien de lancer dans la précipitation nombre de fausses solutions pour l'agriculture. 

  12. La nostra terra vale piu del carbonio

    17 November 2016
    Article

    L'accordo di Parigi ha richiesto alle 196 Parti della Convenzione sul Clima dell'ONU di limitare l'aumento della temperatura a +2° o +1,5° C al di sotto dei livelli preindustriali. Mentre la COP21 aveva visto un alto livello di mobilitazione legato all'adozione di un accordo internazionale, la COP 22 ha invece decisamente ricevuto meno attenzione. Tuttavia le poste in gioco restano significative. Nella fretta, la COP 22, definita "COP dell'azione" o "COP dell'agricoltura", rischia di adottare numerose soluzioni errate nel campo dell'agricoltura.

  13. Our land is worth more than carbon

    17 November 2016
    Article

    The Paris Agreement required the 196 Parties to the UN Climate Convention to limit temperature increases to 2° or 1.5°C below preindustrial levels. While COP21 benefited from a high degree of mobilization linked to the adoption of an international agreement, COP 22 on the other hand has received rather less attention. Yet the stakes remain significant. In its haste, COP 22, being called the “action COP” or the “agriculture COP”, is in danger of adopting various misguided solutions for agriculture.

  14. Guide: Connecting Smallholders to Markets

    08 November 2016
    Report

    The new publication ‘Connecting Smallholders to Markets’ supports advocacy efforts by social movements on market issues by making the recommendations adopted at the Committee on World Food Security more understandable and accessible.

  15. La Marcha del Silencio llena la Plaza Bolívar en Bogotá, octubre de 2016

    On the “NO” vote to endorse the agreements and new paths to build peace in Colombia

    Lyda Fernanda Forero, Danilo Urrea
    01 November 2016
    Article

    The outcome of the October 2nd plebiscite in Colombia was a surprise for the international community and different democratic sectors in the country. It was an invitation to the Colombian population to endorse the Agreements reached between Juan Manuel Santos’ Government and the left wing guerrilla group, the Armed Revolutionary Forces of Colombia (FARC). The outcome was a surprise even among the conservative sectors and those that had opposed the Agreements, who did not expect a majority of a NO vote. The Agreements aimed to end the armed conflict with the guerrilla group which has lasted for more than 50 years.

  16. Re-Asserting Control: Voluntary Return, Restitution and the Right to Land for IDPs and Refugees in Myanmar - cover

    Flawed Global Rules in Agriculture: Need for a New Approach

    Benny Kuruvilla
    27 October 2016
    Multi-media

    Current global agriculture rules perpetuate market concentration in the North and dumping in the South

  17. Building Solidarities for Social, Economic and Environmental Justice

    27 October 2016
    Article

    The economic and political rise of the BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) has far-reaching implications for global agrarian transformation as key sites of production, circulation and consumption of agricultural commodities.

  18. US military base

    Climate change, militarism and war

    Lyda Fernanda Forero, Nick Buxton
    20 October 2016
    Multi-media

    How is climate change both caused by militarism and likely to fuel wars and further militarism? And who will suffer the consequences? This short video documentary, featuring interviews with prominent activists gathered at the UN Climate talks in Paris in 2015 discusses the connections.

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