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  1. Drug warriors are still crying 'reefer madness.' The facts don't support them

    14 June 2015
    Other news

    In their op-ed article against cannabis legalization, former drug czar William J. Bennett and Seth Leibsohn yearn for a time when fear-mongering, not facts, drove the marijuana policy debate in America.

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    Gaviria afirma que EEUU "empezó la guerra contra las drogas y ahora la está terminando"

    12 March 2015
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    El expresidente de Colombia César Gaviria, miembro de la llamada "Comisión Global de Políticas sobre Drogas", considera que el cambio en las políticas sobre drogas en EE.UU., simbolizado por la legalización de la marihuana en varios Estados, es el principio del fin de la denominada "guerra contra las drogas". Gaviria no cree en una "política única" frente las drogas, dadas las grandes diferencias en las realidades de los países y destaca que en "Europa están experimentando y aplicando políticas diferentes en relación con el consumo desde hace más de dos décadas".

  3. Two headlines perfectly sum up everything wrong with American drug policy

    02 March 2015
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    Two stories published last week perfectly sum up the state of American drug policy.

  4. Four of the major fear campaigns that helped create America's insane war on drugs

    08 February 2015
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    If moral entrepreneurs and interest groups manage to whip up enough fear and anxiety, they can create a full-blown moral panic, the widespread sense that the moral condition of society is deteriorating at a rapid pace, which can be conveniently used to distract from underlying, status quo-threatening social problems and exert social control over the working class or other rebellious sectors of society.

  5. Leading anti-marijuana academics are paid by painkiller drug companies

    26 August 2014
    Other news

    As Americans continue to embrace pot—as medicine and for recreational use—opponents are turning to a set of academic researchers to claim that policymakers should avoid relaxing restrictions around marijuana. It's too dangerous, risky, and untested, they say. Just as drug company-funded research has become incredibly controversial in recent years, forcing major medical schools and journals to institute strict disclosure requirements, could there be a conflict of interest issue in the pot debate? (See also: The real reason pot is still illegal)

  6. The federal marijuana ban is rooted in myth and xenophobia

    28 July 2014
    Other news

    The federal law that makes possession of marijuana a crime has its origins in legislation that was passed in an atmosphere of hysteria during the 1930s and that was firmly rooted in prejudices against Mexican immigrants and African-Americans, who were associated with marijuana use at the time. This racially freighted history lives on in current federal policy, which is so driven by myth and propaganda that it is almost impervious to reason.

  7. The Guardian view on overdue overhauling of US and global drug laws

    Icaria Editorial
    27 July 2014
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    The war on drugs has been a losing fight for 40 years.

  8. Repeal Prohibition, Again

    Icaria Editorial
    27 July 2014
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    It took 13 years for the United States to come to its senses and end Prohibition, 13 years in which people kept drinking, otherwise law-abiding citizens became criminals and crime syndicates arose and flourished. It has been more than 40 years since Congress passed the current ban on marijuana, inflicting great harm on society just to prohibit a substance far less dangerous than alcohol. The federal government should repeal the ban on marijuana. (See also: Why the New York Times editorial series calling for marijuana legalization is such a big deal and Evolving on Marijuana)

  9. Canada's 'Prince of Pot' to be released from U.S. prison

    06 July 2014
    Other news

    When the poster child for marijuana legalization is released from a U.S. prison later this week, he'll be re-entering a world where many of his ideas have taken root and in some places have sprouted right up. Marc Emery, Canada’s self-styled “Prince of Pot,” concludes a five-year sentence and will emerge into a lucrative marijuana landscape, where two U.S. states are now issuing recreational pot licences, medical growers are reaping profits and investors aren’t hedging on potential opportunities.

  10. The real reason pot is still illegal

    30 June 2014
    Other news

    The Community Anti-Drug Coalition of America (CADCA), one of the largest anti-legalization organizations in the US has a curious sponsor: Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer of Oxy-Contin, the highly addictive painkiller that has been linked to thousands of overdose deaths nationwide. A familiar confederation of anti-pot interests have a financial stake in the status quo, including law enforcement agencies, pharmaceutical firms, and nonprofits funded by federal drug-prevention grants.

  11. How neuroscience reinforces racist drug policy

    Nathan Greenslit
    12 June 2014
    Other news

    A recent neuroscience study from Harvard Medical School claims to have discovered brain differences between people who smoke marijuana and people who do not. Such well-intentioned and seemingly objective science is actually a new chapter in a politicized and bigoted history of drug science in the United States. Different-looking brains tell us literally nothing about who these people are, what their lives are like, why they do or do not use marijuana, or what effects marijuana has had on them.

  12. Is the war on drugs nearing an end?

    07 April 2013
    Other news

    For four decades, libertarians, civil rights activists and drug treatment experts have stood outside of the political mainstream in arguing that the war on drugs was sending too many people to prison, wasting too much money, wrenching apart too many families -- and all for little or no public benefit. They were always in the minority. But a sign of a new reality emerged: for the first time in four decades of polling, the Pew Research Center found that more than half of Americans support legalizing marijuana.

  13. Brad Pitt: America's war on drugs is a charade, and a failure

    Brad Pitt
    31 March 2013
    Other news

    "Since declaring a war on drugs 40 years ago, the United States has spent more than a trillion dollars, arrested more than 45 million people, and racked up the highest incarceration rate in the world. Yet it remains laughably easy to obtain illegal drugs. So why do we continue down this same path? Why do we talk about the drug war as if it's a success? It's a charade." (See: The house I live in)

  14. fight-crime

    The DEA's marijuana mistake

    Icaria Editorial
    24 January 2013
    Other news

    A pro-marijuana group lost its legal battle when a federal appellate court ruled that marijuana would remain a Schedule I drug, defined as having no accepted medical value and a high potential for abuse. For years, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and the National Institute for Drug Abuse have made it all but impossible to develop a robust body of research on the medical uses of marijuana. For a muscular agency that combats vicious drug criminals, the DEA acts like a terrified and obstinate toddler when it comes to basic science.

  15. nixon

    ¿Ha perdido Estados Unidos la guerra contra las drogas?

    Gary S. Becker, Kevin M. Murphy
    06 January 2013
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    El entonces presidente de Estados Unidos Richard Nixon declaró en 1971 "la guerra contra las drogas". La expectativa era que el narcotráfico en el país podría reducirse drásticamente en poco tiempo mediante operaciones policiales. Sin embargo, la lucha continúa. El costo ha sido grande en términos de vidas, dinero y el bienestar de muchos estadounidenses, especialmente los pobres y los de menor nivel educativo. Según la mayoría de los recuentos, los beneficios de la guerra han sido modestos en el mejor de los casos.

  16. As US states legalise marijuana, is this the end of the drugs war?

    Eugene Jarecki
    10 November 2012
    Other news

    Last week was a momentous week, the beginning of the end, perhaps, of a national depravity – the "war on drugs". The voters of Colorado and Washington passed measures to legalise marijuana, amounting to local shifts, for the moment. So we shouldn't delude ourselves that the country will be transformed overnight, but the public thinking, the public spirit is being transformed. Finally, there is a growing realisation that this "war" has produced nothing but a legacy of failure. And who wants to be associated with failure?

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    ¿El ocaso de la prohibición?

    Rodrigo Uprimny Yepes
    09 November 2012

    yes-we-can2El pasado martes en EE.UU. hubo dos votaciones que pueden llegar a ser más trascendentales para Colombia y América Latina que la reelección de Obama: en Colorado y en el estado de Washington (no en la capital federal), una mayoría de ciudadanos aprobó la legalización de la marihuana. Esos referendos no se limitaron a despenalizar el consumo o a aprobar el uso medicinal del cannabis, que ya existe en muchas partes de EE. UU., sino que tomaron un paso más radical: legalizaron la venta de marihuana para uso recreativo.

  18. U.S. vote may be beginning of the end for War on Drugs

    05 November 2012
    Other news

    "Exactly 80 years ago (in 1932), Colorado voters approved a ballot measure to appeal alcohol prohibition, and that came before it being repealed by the federal government," said Mason Tvert, co-director of the Yes on 64 campaign in Colorado. "And it was the individual states taking that type of action that ultimately resulted in the federal repeal (of Prohibition in 1933)." As happened with alcohol, so it is beginning to happen with marijuana. No matter what the outcome of the votes, the bugler is sounding retreat.

  19. 75 years of racial control: happy birthday marijuana prohibition

    Amanda Reiman, Policy manager, Bill Piper (Drug Policy Alliance)
    27 September 2012
    Other news

    As we approach the 75th anniversary of marijuana prohibition in the United States on October 1, it is important to remember why marijuana was deemed illicit in the first place: "There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the US, and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz and swing, result from marijuana usage. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others."- Harry Anslinger, first US Drug Czar.

  20. The War On Drugs Hurts Businesses and Investors

    Eric Sterling
    29 February 2012
    Other news

    “The drug war is weakening state institutions, infiltrating judicial systems and undermining rule of law,” all of which is bad for business, César Zamora, Nicaraguan businessman and vice president of the Association of American Chambers of Commerce in Latin America (AACCLA) told the Christian Science Monitor on February 16, 2012. The business community needs a complete economic analysis of the impact of drug policy to fully understand how American drug policy plays with their profits. Every investor should analyze how much the costs of drug policy shrink return on investment.

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