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3 items
  1. The development of international drug control

    • Martin Jelsma
    15 February 2011
    Policy briefing

    The emergence of more pragmatic and less punitive approaches to the drugs issue may represent the beginning of change in the current global drug control regime.

  2. The Crime Decline & California’s Priorities in the 21st Century

    Tom Reifer
    01 June 2011
    Article

    That increasing numbers of California's youth end up in prison may yield some short term perceptions of declining crime rates, but what about the long-term education deficit?

  3. Drug Control Policy: What the United States Can Learn from Latin America

    • Coletta Youngers
    21 June 2011

    Since the 1912 signing of the Hague Opium Convention—the agreement that formally established narcotics control within international law—the United States has established itself as the dominant actor in determining drug control policies around the world. A chief architect of the international drug control regime, Washington has done its best to ensure that all subsequent international conventions obligate countries to adapt their domestic legislation to criminalize virtually all acts related to the illicit market in controlled substances, with the important exception of drug consumption. The predominant focus on prohibition and criminalization has been exported to Latin America, where the vast majority of the cocaine and heroin consumed in the United States originates.