Search results

14 items
  1. National dialogue on Land Tenure and Land Use rights held

    25 November 2012
    In the media

    The Union minister U Tin Naing Thein called for suggestions on urbanization projects, housing plans for the increased population and plans for homeless persons. He stressed the need to put emphasis on ensuring better socioeconomic status of rural people who make up 70 per cent of the total population and laying down farmland and land use policies.

  2. Nu begint het moeilijke werk

    Minka Nijhuis
    13 April 2012
    In the media

    De oppositie in Burma behaalde op 1 april een klinkende verkiezingsoverwinning. De verwachtingen zijn hoog gespannen. Te hoog?


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    Ethnic Peace and Political Participation

    23 August 2012
    Report

    Ceasefires have been agreed; the NLD has elected representatives in the national legislatures; Western sanctions are being lifted; and the World Bank and other international agencies are returning to set up office in the country. Such developments are likely to have a defining impact on ethnic politics, which remains one of the central challenges facing the country today.

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    Assessing Burma/Myanmar’s New Government

    19 April 2012
    Policy briefing

    Burma is in the midst of its most important period of political transition in over two decades. TNI and BCN hosted a conference to look at the challenges and opportunities in five key areas: politics, ethnic relations, the economy, social and humanitarian affairs, and the international landscape.

  5. Burma’s peace process still fragile

    Karen News
    26 August 2012
    In the media

    Positive political changes in Burma – including the release of 1,500 political prisoners – have unfolded rapidly since a flawed election saw ex-general Thein Sein come into power in 2011. But reform is “still at a tentative and early stage”.

  6. Financing Dispossession - China’s Opium Substitution Programme in Northern Burma

    • Tom Kramer, Kevin Woods
    20 February 2012

    China’s opium crop substitution programme has very little to do with providing mechanisms to decrease reliance on poppy cultivation or provide alternative livelihoods for ex-poppy growers. Financing dispossession is not development.

     

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    Land confiscation issue major concern for Burma’s rights groups

    23 October 2012
    In the media

    Land confiscation disputes are increasing in Burma, where all land is nominally owned by the state.

  8. Burma's misguided Drug War

    Tom Fawthrop
    05 April 2012
    In the media

    Keen to impress the West and get sanctions lifted, Burma is cracking down on opium production. But hundreds of thousands may be left in poverty.

  9. Burmese Investment Boom Fuels Worries Over Land Grabs

    Ron Corben
    22 October 2012
    In the media

    The opening of Burma’s economy to foreign investors is leading to conflicts over land confiscation, as politically-connected businessmen seize agricultural lands for development projects

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    Burma at the Crossroads

    05 June 2012
    Policy briefing

    The people of Burma are at a critical juncture in their struggle for democracy and ethnic reform. Decisions taken by leading parties and protagonists in the months ahead could well define the direction of national politics for many years to come.

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    Ending Burma’s Conflict Cycle?

    21 February 2012
    Policy briefing

    Peace does not just involve the government and ethnic armed opposition groups, but involves all of Burma's citizens.

  12. Financing Dispossession

    • Kevin Woods, Tom Kramer
    21 February 2012
    Report

    China’s opium crop substitution programme has very little to do with providing mechanisms to decrease reliance on poppy cultivation or provide alternative livelihoods for ex-poppy growers. Financing dispossession is not development.
     

  13. Why peace and land security is key to Burma's democratic future

    Tom Kramer
    11 May 2012
    Article

    Analysis of the social costs of large-scale Chinese-supported rubber farms in northern Burma suggests that the future for ordinary citizens will be affected as much by the country's chosen economic path as the political reforms underway.