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122 items
  1. US backing crucial to Gaza attacks

    Phyllis Bennis
    20 November 2012
    Multi-media

    Israel's attack on Gaza could not have happened without the strong support of US administration, but the political changes in the Middle East have left Israel and the US more isolated than ever.

  2. Does the European Union deserve the Nobel Peace Prize?

    Ben Hayes
    25 October 2012
    Article

    Giving the Nobel Peace Prize to the EU for maintaining peace is like crediting Alexander Graham Bell for the i-phone. Since its formation in 1993, the EU has increasingly shunned peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights. 

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    The Other Burma

    • Ben Hayes
    11 October 2012
    Report

    Northeast India's strategic location between India, China and southeast Asia has led to a recent boom in resource extraction and investment by multinational corporations, but the world continues to remain largely silent on the human rights abuses that continue to be perpetrated by the Indian military. 

  4. Peace for Syria will not come from the outside

    Phyllis Bennis, interviewed by Claire Schaeffer-Duffy
    04 October 2012
    Article

    There is not a lot that can be done for the Syrian conflict from outside except keep the U.S. out of Syria militarily and provide moral support for the nonviolent, democratic opposition.

  5. Burma’s peace process still fragile

    Karen News
    26 August 2012
    In the media

    Positive political changes in Burma – including the release of 1,500 political prisoners – have unfolded rapidly since a flawed election saw ex-general Thein Sein come into power in 2011. But reform is “still at a tentative and early stage”.

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    Ethnic Peace and Political Participation

    23 August 2012
    Report

    Ceasefires have been agreed; the NLD has elected representatives in the national legislatures; Western sanctions are being lifted; and the World Bank and other international agencies are returning to set up office in the country. Such developments are likely to have a defining impact on ethnic politics, which remains one of the central challenges facing the country today.

  7. Blacklists and the criminalisation of conflict resolution

    11 August 2012

    This project investigates the impacts of terrorist designation upon conflict resolution processes – specifically, seeking to understand the operation and effect of laws that designate non-state actors engaged in armed conflict as ‘terrorist’.

  8. Romney backs Israel in the battle of the Iran red lines

    Phyllis Bennis
    02 August 2012
    Article

    Beyond the insulting gaffes and racist comments, Romney's statement on Iran suggests a seriously 'extremist war-mongering' agenda that could have devastating consequences.

  9. The Phases of War: Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, and Israel

    Phyllis Bennis
    19 April 2012
    Article

    The U.S. is 11 years into its current war in Afghanistan and still losing. We never had a chance to "win" this war of vengeance – and while few in Washington are ready to admit that, they’ve continued to revise and redefine just what "winning" might look like.

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    Assessing Burma/Myanmar’s New Government

    19 April 2012
    Policy briefing

    Burma is in the midst of its most important period of political transition in over two decades. TNI and BCN hosted a conference to look at the challenges and opportunities in five key areas: politics, ethnic relations, the economy, social and humanitarian affairs, and the international landscape.

  11. After Gadhafi, the West eyes the Libyan prize

    Phyllis Bennis
    22 October 2011
    Article

    The Libyan people face major challenges in deepening democracy in a country that is oil rich, deeply divided and dependant on NATO for its victory against Gadhafi.

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    African political unity must be more selective: A blueprint for change

    • William Gumede
    22 September 2011
    Paper

    There cannot be any clearer illustration of the impotence of Africa’s continental and regional institutions to find local solutions to the continent’s problems, than their numbing inaction in the face of the wave of popular rebellions against dictators in North Africa sweeping across the continent.

     
  13. Bye-bye peace process: Palestine comes to the UN

    Phyllis Bennis
    21 September 2011
    Article

    After 20 years of failed U.S. diplomacy based on protecting Israel’s occupation, the need to move to a new diplomacy rooted in international law and human rights remains a vital necessity.

  14. 9/11: Ten years later, who have we become?

    Tom Reifer
    13 September 2011
    Article

    Ten years and two wars later, Americans face the monetary and psychological costs of both militarism and Wall Street materialism, effectively bankrupting the country; not to mention the casualties of war at home, and in Afghanistan and Iraq.

  15. 9/11 did not start or end at midnight

    Richard Falk
    13 September 2011
    Article

    All too often 9/11 is viewed from the perspective of the nation-state rather than from a global standpoint.

  16. September 11th Didn't Change the World. September 12th Did

    Phyllis Bennis
    12 September 2011
    Article

    It wasn’t the events of September 11th that changed the world, but the events of September 12th and beyond, when the Bush administration took the world to war in response; that changed the world, and continues to threaten U.S. and global security, and shred U.S. democracy.

  17. Headlines or Not, the Iraq War is Not Over

    Phyllis Bennis
    08 September 2011
    Article

    It might seem like cause for celebration after reading the New York Times headline, "Iraq War Marks First Month with No U.S. Military Deaths." But the smaller print on the page reminds us why celebrating is not really in order: "Many Iraqis are killed..." 

  18. The Afghanistan War in the Mirror of the Tet Offensive

    Richard Falk
    23 August 2011
    Article

    U.S. foreign policy still fails to incorporate the lessons learned from the Tet Offensive. The refusal to admit goals weren't achieved in Afghanistan is frustrating to say the least.

  19. The global resource grab

    Jun Borras, Maryann Manahan, Yao Graham
    30 June 2011
    Multi-media

    Worsening climate change and the emergence of new economic powers is leading to a renewed scramble for resources, with negative consequences for many impoverished communities.

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    Conflict or Peace? Ethnic Unrest Intensifies in Burma

    23 June 2011
    Policy briefing

    The breakdown in the ceasefire of the Kachin Independence Organisation (KIO) with the central government represents a major failure in national politics and threatens to escalate to serious humanitarian crisis if not immediately addressed.

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