Search results

14 items
  1. Policy Shift

    • Sylvia Kay
    14 April 2014
    Report

    'Policy Shift' identifies ten key policy changes that are required to support just alternative agriculture investments. The approach integrates human rights into the core of decision-making and is informed by practical, on-the-ground examples of positive agricultural investments that benefit both small-scale farmers and communities.

  2. Thumbnail

    The Transnational Institute at Voedsel Anders

    24 March 2014
    Report

    TNI was there, when Wageningen University witnessed the dynamism of the modern food movement, at a two day conference that shared views on farming, research, advocacy and activism, and a commitment to transforming our food and agriculture systems

  3. Five sites of struggle and potential transformation

    • Zoe Brent, Tanya Kerssen
    21 October 2014
    Report

    Corporate control of the food system in the US continues to undermine the livelihoods of farmers, farmworkers, fisherpeople, communities of color, and indigenous peoples in the US, but there are also increasing examples of community-based resistance, grassroots solidarity, and broad-based alliances that are resisting the corporate takeover.

  4. Thumbnail

    Farmland meets Finance

    • Madeleine Fairbairn
    27 May 2014
    Paper

    At the turn of the 21st century, farmland was still considered an investment backwater by most of the financial sector. Although some insurance companies have had farmland holdings for years, most financial investors found farmland, and agricultural investment in general, unappealing compared to the much higher returns to be made in financial markets.

  5. Thumbnail

    Land Conflicts and the Criminalization of Peasant Movements in Paraguay

    • FIAN International, La Via Campesina
    30 August 2014
    Report

    On June 15, 2012, seventeen people— farmers and police officers—were killed in Curuguaty, Paraguay. This report focuses on the enabling conditions in the land governance structure that allowed this massacre to take place, detailing a climate of violence and impunity, the absence of protections for small and landless farmers, and the use of state repression in the service of the country’s powerful landed elite.

  6. Thumbnail

    Land grabbing under the Cover of Law

    • Tomaso Ferrando
    03 September 2014
    Paper

    The BRICS are following the pattern traditionally adopted by Northern countries of enclosing and exploiting land, both nationally and abroad, to benefit capital and global agro-industrialisation. They are also using law and diplomacy, notably Bilateral Investment Agreements, in order to facilitate access to foreign land, and foster their own economic interests.

  7. The New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition

    • Nora McKeon
    27 May 2014
    Report

    Global corporations are increasingly influencing development policy, resulting in partnership agreements like the New Alliance for Food and Nutrition Security that grow corporate profits while endangering the livelihoods of small-scale farmers.

  8. Pro-Business or Pro-Poor?

    23 October 2014
    Paper

    What are the potential implications for Myanmars majority rural working poor now after the unveiling of the much-awaited draft national land use policy?

  9. Women Agricultural Workers

    • Denisse Córdova, Cornelia Helmcke, Flavio Valente, Yifang Slot-Tang
    16 September 2014
    Report

    While access to waged agricultural work can bring about benefits to women, this paper aims to shed light on the discriminatory working conditions women agricultural workers endure in industries where women have traditionally constituted a significant share of the workforce.

  10. Thumbnail

    Beyond the BRICS' Rhetoric: An Inquiry on South-South Land grabbing

    • Tomaso Ferrando
    18 November 2014
    Report

    BRICS countries’ investors play an increasingly crucial role in land investments. Just as the global trend of increased interest and investment in land has led to a surge of land grabbing, BRICS investments have proved no different.

  11. Reclaiming Agricultural Investment

    • Sylvia Kay
    19 May 2014
    Report

    Effective state policies and investments in support of small scale food producers does not only provide a socially just alternative to a model based on foreign direct investment in agro-industries, but it is also a safeguard against land grabbing.

     
  12. Thumbnail

    Protecting Profits over People

    • Kevin Woods, Daniel Aguirre
    25 November 2014
    Report

    Myanmar is in the process of formulating an investment law and a land use policy that when combined will lay the foundations of development for the country. As it stands, these proposed instruments could have an adverse impact on human rights, and in particular land rights.

  13. The Global Ocean Grab: A Primer

    • Jennifer Franco, Pietje Vervest, Timothé Feodoroff, Carsten Pedersen, Ricarda Reuter, Mads Barbesgaard
    02 September 2014
    Primer

    This primer unveils a new wave of ocean grabbing, answering the most important questions about the mechanisms that facilitate it and the impacts on people and the environment.

  14. State of Power 2014 cover

    State of counter-power: How understanding neoliberalism’s cultural underpinnings can equip movements to overthrow it

    • Hilary Wainwright
    06 February 2014
    Report

    There is mounting evidence that neoliberal policies are losing legitimacy. The translation of such disaffection into positive commitment to an alternative, however, requires deeper disengagement from the dominant order and practical participation in creating alternatives. A social order built on escaping the pressures of democracy while at the same time depending on the capacities of many desiring democracy is unlikely to be stable. Thus the opaque and indirect forms of power typical of neoliberal rule are simultaneously sources of vulnerability and dependence, and breeding grounds for the power to subvert and transform.