Search results

25 items
  1. Carbon Trading

    01 January 2014
    Topic

    Carbon trading, or the trading of permits to pollute, is a market-based approach for reducing carbon emissions which is deeply flawed, ineffective and unjust. Seeking to turn carbon in the atmosphere into a privatised commodity has created markets susceptible to corporate pressure, distracted from the systemic changes needed to convert our economies, and inflicted injustices on marginalised communities in North that become trapped in pollution hotspots and peasant communities in the South who have been dispossessed of land and livelihoods in the name of climate action.

  2. Land and Sovereignty in the Americas

    01 January 2014
    Topic

    Research and analysis from activists and scholars working to understand and halt the alarming trend in “land grabbing” and to support rural and urban communities in their efforts to protect their lands as the basis for self-determination, food justice and food sovereignty. The series is a project of the Land & Sovereignty in the Americas (LSA) activist-researcher collective, coordinated by Food First.

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    Agro-ecology

    01 January 2014
    Topic
  4. Thumbnail hands off the land

    Hands Off The Land

    01 January 2014
    Topic
    The Hands off the Land project aims to raise awareness about land grabbing amongst the European public, politicians, policy makers, students and professionals.
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    Beyond the BRICS' Rhetoric: An Inquiry on South-South Land grabbing

    • Tomaso Ferrando
    18 November 2014
    Report

    BRICS countries’ investors play an increasingly crucial role in land investments. Just as the global trend of increased interest and investment in land has led to a surge of land grabbing, BRICS investments have proved no different.

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    Protecting Profits over People

    • Kevin Woods, Daniel Aguirre
    25 November 2014
    Report

    Myanmar is in the process of formulating an investment law and a land use policy that when combined will lay the foundations of development for the country. As it stands, these proposed instruments could have an adverse impact on human rights, and in particular land rights.

  7. Policy Shift

    • Sylvia Kay
    14 April 2014
    Report

    'Policy Shift' identifies ten key policy changes that are required to support just alternative agriculture investments. The approach integrates human rights into the core of decision-making and is informed by practical, on-the-ground examples of positive agricultural investments that benefit both small-scale farmers and communities.

  8. Pro-Business or Pro-Poor?

    23 October 2014
    Paper

    What are the potential implications for Myanmars majority rural working poor now after the unveiling of the much-awaited draft national land use policy?

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    The Transnational Institute at Voedsel Anders

    24 March 2014
    Report

    TNI was there, when Wageningen University witnessed the dynamism of the modern food movement, at a two day conference that shared views on farming, research, advocacy and activism, and a commitment to transforming our food and agriculture systems

  10. Women Agricultural Workers

    • Denisse Córdova, Cornelia Helmcke, Flavio Valente, Yifang Slot-Tang
    16 September 2014
    Report

    While access to waged agricultural work can bring about benefits to women, this paper aims to shed light on the discriminatory working conditions women agricultural workers endure in industries where women have traditionally constituted a significant share of the workforce.

  11. Reclaiming Agricultural Investment

    • Sylvia Kay
    19 May 2014
    Report

    Effective state policies and investments in support of small scale food producers does not only provide a socially just alternative to a model based on foreign direct investment in agro-industries, but it is also a safeguard against land grabbing.

     
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    Land grabbing under the Cover of Law

    • Tomaso Ferrando
    03 September 2014
    Paper

    The BRICS are following the pattern traditionally adopted by Northern countries of enclosing and exploiting land, both nationally and abroad, to benefit capital and global agro-industrialisation. They are also using law and diplomacy, notably Bilateral Investment Agreements, in order to facilitate access to foreign land, and foster their own economic interests.

  13. The Politics of Flex crops and Commodities

    • Jennifer Franco, Jun Borras, Pietje Vervest, S. Ryan Isakson, Les Levidow
    20 June 2014
    Report

    Flex crops are crops that can be used for food, feed, fuel or industrial material. Their emergence as critical global commodities is integral to understanding today's agroindustrial economy. 

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    The Emerging Economies and Climate Change

    • Praful Bidwai
    04 September 2014
    Paper

    The BASIC bloc of countries in UN negotiations have too often ended up collaborating and colluding with the inaction of industrialised countries, undermining the future of the poor in their own countries and throughout the South.

  15. Flex trees

    • Markus Kröger
    20 June 2014
    Report

    Flex trees seem to offer timely opportunities for socio-environmentally sustainable solutions, but also present dangers, particularly if such changes accelerate the concentration of land and plantation-based development, whereby forests compete with and may replace food production.

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    The Victims and Land Restitution Law in Colombia in context

    • Paula Martínez Cortés
    13 January 2014
    Report

    Law 1448 has been promoted as a demonstration of ‘good will’ by Santos' government in Colombia. The law’s main objective is to provide recognition to the victims of the Colombian armed conflict. This stands in contrast to the policy of denial enacted by the previous government.

  17. Reclaiming Free Prior and Informed Consent

    • Jennifer Franco
    15 July 2014
    Policy briefing

    The jury is still out on Free Pior and Informed Consent (FPIC). Will it ‘help’ or ‘hurt’ the cause of agrarian justice? The dilemmas and challenges of using FPIC are already surfacing and warrant closer attention – precisely because of what is at stake: what development, for whom and what purposes, how and where, and with what implications?

  18. Anglo American’s dirty energy lobby and its false climate solutions

    • Lyda Fernanda Forero, Lúcia Ortiz, Pascoe Sabido, Rachel Tansey, Danilo Urrea, Sara Shaw
    03 December 2014
    Report

    Climate talks in Lima will be subject to intense lobbying by some of the biggest industrial polluters. They not only cause serious social and environmental conflicts where they extract fossil fuels, their capture of decision-making also prevents a real solution to the climate crisis.

  19. Venezuela: terminal crisis of the rentier petro-state?

    • Edgardo Lander, Translator; Sara Shields
    02 October 2014
    Paper

    Venezuela's failure to develop an effective strategy to reduce its economy's dependence on gas and oil threatens the social successes and future viability of the Bolivarian project.

  20. Five sites of struggle and potential transformation

    • Zoe Brent, Tanya Kerssen
    21 October 2014
    Report

    Corporate control of the food system in the US continues to undermine the livelihoods of farmers, farmworkers, fisherpeople, communities of color, and indigenous peoples in the US, but there are also increasing examples of community-based resistance, grassroots solidarity, and broad-based alliances that are resisting the corporate takeover.

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