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109 items
  1. Has the US just called for unilateral interpretation of multilateral obligations?

    Rick Lines, Damon Barrett
    17 December 2014
    Opinion

    These are interesting times for drug law reform, which, as it gathers pace, is asking important questions of international law. A UN General Assembly Special Session on Drugs is set for 2016 just as national reforms are challenging international treaties that form the bedrock of a global prohibition regime that has dominated since the turn of the twentieth century. States parties to the three UN drug control conventions must now confront the legal and political dilemmas this creates. This is the situation in which the US now finds itself following cannabis reforms in various states that are at odds with these treaties.

  2. Flexcrops, Oceangrabbing and Land use policy

    16 December 2014
    Article

    Agrarian Justice Newsletter Issue 6

  3. For a Citizen’s Trade Agenda

    16 December 2014
    Article

    'This is a fight we can win' says Susan George as she delivered the opening speech during the GUE/NLG meeting against TTIP.

  4. ‘There is no voice of real farmers’

    Portia Larlee
    11 December 2014
    Article

    The release of the draft policy, part of a process towards enacting a new National Land Law and “harmonising” existing legislation, was greeted with objections and criticism from farmers’ organisations and ethnic minority groups throughout the country.

  5. The draft land use policy: putting big business first

    Jennifer Franco
    11 December 2014
    Article

    There are some big problems with the current draft of the policy and they stem mainly from its failure to recognise that land has more than an economic function.

  6. Fighting The New Green War

    Praful Bidwai
    10 December 2014
    Article

    A distinguishing mark of the Narendra Modi government is the determined and methodical manner in which it is diluting, even scuttling, India’s already weak environmental regulation system in the name of promoting “fast-track clearances” and rapid industrial development.

  7. Ebb and Flow of Privatized Water – from Buenos Aires to Atlanta, from Mozambique to France

    Nick Buxton
    02 December 2014
    Article

    In May 2000, a Fortune Magazine piece claimed triumphantly that the “liquid everybody needs – and will need a lot more of in the future – is going private,” and as a result would benefit “multitudes of poor people.”

  8. The 'Fifth Stage' of Drug Control

    Rick Lines (University of Essex)
    30 November 2014
    Article

    Writing in 1996, Norbert Gilmore noted that ‘little has been written about drug use and human rights. Human rights are rarely mentioned expressly in drug literature and drug use is rarely mentioned in human rights literature.’ [1] Almost twenty years later, the literature examining drug control issues through the lens of international human rights law has grown, but the total body of peer reviewed commentary and analysis in this area would barely rank the issue as a footnote in the broader human rights lexicon.

  9. The Canada-EU Trade Deal Could Unleash a Corporate Litigation Boom

    27 November 2014
    Article

    A new Canada-EU trade deal, called the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), could expose Canada and Europe to a wave of corporate lawsuits that would restrict governments’ power to regulate in the public interest—including in confronting climate change.

  10. Into the breach: Drugs, control, and violating bad laws in good ways

    Rick Lines
    27 November 2014
    Opinion

    An October statement on drug control from the US State Department has prompted much comment and speculation at home and abroad. Delivered by Ambassador William Brownfield, the ‘Brownfield Doctrine’, as it has been named by some commentators, lays out a four pillar approach the United States will follow in matters of international drug control.

  11. Reclaiming People’s Sovereignty in an era of Corporate Power

    Brid Brennan
    26 November 2014
    Article

    Despite the track record of systemic and systematic violations of the range of human rights, the efforts to establish legally binding obligations and an instrument of enforcement within the UN system have been defeated by determined corporate opposition. The current Guiding Principles developed by the former Special Representative of the UN Secretary General, John Ruggie, do not create "any new international legal obligations" and are therefore non-binding.

  12. Has the US' War on Drugs Been Lost and what Lessons Should Europe Heed?

    Martin Jelsma
    26 November 2014
    Article

    With a greater number of casualties than the Afghanistan and Iraq campaigns combined, and very meagre results, the US is starting to reconsider the "War on Drugs", waged since the '70s.

  13. Marine Protected Areas in South Africa - ocean grabbing by another name

    Timothé Feodoroff, Mads Barbesgaard, Carsten Pedersen
    24 November 2014
    Article

    On World Fisheries Day, fisher peoples and their allies are taking to the streets and beaches to fight against ocean grabbing in all its forms - including Marine Protected Areas imposed without consultation that rob and criminalise local communities and benefit only privileged outsiders.

  14. Fatal Attraction: Brownfield's Flexibility Doctrine and Global Drug Policy Reform

    David Bewley-Taylor, Martin Jelsma, Damon Barrett
    19 November 2014
    Article

    State-level cannabis reforms have exposed the inability of the United States to abide by the terms of the legal bedrock of the global drug control system. It is calls for a conversation the US federal government wishes to avoid. The result is a new official position on the UN drugs treaties that, despite its seductively progressive tone, serves only to sustain the status quo and may cause damage beyond drug policy.

  15. Fatal attraction: Brownfield's flexibility doctrine and global drug policy reform

    Martin Jelsma, David Bewley-Taylor, Damon Barrett
    18 November 2014
    Article

    State-level cannabis reforms, which gathered steam this month, have exposed the inability of the United States to abide by the terms of the legal bedrock of the global drug control system; the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs. This is something that should force a much-needed conversation about reform to long- standing international agreements. But while ostensibly 'welcoming' the international drug policy reform debate, it is a conversation the US federal government actually wishes to avoid.

  16. Dilma Rousseff has a Second Chance to invigorate Brazil’s Foreign Policy

    Gonzalo Berrón, Bianca Suyama
    04 November 2014
    Article

    The South American giant needs to live up to its ideals on the global stage, and civil society activists have a role to play

  17. Ocean grabbing: a new wave of enclosures

    Carsten Pedersen, Mads Barbesgaard
    21 October 2014
    Article

    Not only are the small-scale fisher communities best placed to ensure food sovereignty, but they are also the starting point for any serious transition towards an ecologically and socially just food regime. We need a revolution to bring the oceans back into the global commons.

  18. EU-Japan FTA - open Letter to Commissioner Karel de Gucht

    Satoko Kishimoto
    19 October 2014
    Article

    In an open letter Japanese & European groups call for transparency in the EU-Japan trade talks and removing the Investor-State Dispute Settlement mechanism (ISDS) from the Free Trade Agreement (FTA)

  19. Crisis in Venezuela, TTIP resistance in EU, and rise of Podemos in Spain

    17 October 2014
    Article

    Newsletter 17 October 2014

  20. A Peoples' vision for a just and inclusive Asia and Europe

    16 October 2014
    Article

    One week before the official Asia-Europe government meeting (ASEM) gathers in Milan, over 400 people from 42 countries in Europe and Asia gathered at the 10th Asia-Europe Peoples forum (AEPF) to present their demands and recommendations.

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