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5 items
  1. Central and Eastern European countries at the crossroads

    • Pietje Vervest, Cecilia Olivet
    26 June 2015
    Report

    Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries find themselves at a crossroad regarding their investment protection policies with the US. This briefing provides evidence that shows that including investment arbitration in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) will worsen the capacity for CEE governments to regulate.

  2. TTIP Why the Rest of the World should Beware

    • Manuel Pérez-Rocha
    03 June 2015
    Paper

    Why should human rights, environmental and consumer advocate organizations all over the world that are working toward a world different from the corporate-led neoliberal dogma, pay special attention to TTIP?

  3. Lawyers subverting the public interest

    • Cecilia Olivet, Pietje Vervest, Pia Eberhardt, Fabian Flues
    15 April 2015
    Policy briefing

    In response to growing public criticism of international investment law, a new lobby group has emerged, EFILA, seeking to influence European officials. This briefing exposes how EFILA represents an attempt by the arbitration industry to fend off much-needed reforms in order to protect a highly lucrative business.

  4. International Investment Agreements Under Scrutiny

    04 March 2015
    Report

    Citizens and policy makers around the world are increasingly questioning the trade agreement system, especially the investor-state dispute settlement mechanism (ISDS) that enables foreign investors to bypass the legal system of host states and sue governments before private tribunals for any policy, democratically passed law, or judgment of a court that adversely affects them.

     
  5. Socialising Losses, Privatising Gains

    • Pietje Vervest, Hilde van der Pas, Roos van Os, Roeline Knottnerus
    27 January 2015
    Report

    Dutch investment treaties (BITs) are frequently used by foreign companies to sue governments in the North and South for policies that might harm their future profits. 75% of these cases were brought by mailbox companies with no real economic substance in the Netherlands, making use of the vast web of Dutch BITs and the rights and protection given to foreign investors.