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5 items
  1. UDAPT calls for a “Global Minga” to campaign for an international treaty to hold corporate criminals accountable

    Natsumi Koike
    23 December 2015
    Article

    In a recent Public Forum held in Amsterdam, representatives of the Union of People Affected by Texaco (UDAPT) from Ecuador began their Europe speaking tour with a call for a “Global Minga” to support a treaty that will sanction transnational corporations for their crimes and ensure access to justice for affected communities. 

  2. Progress and its discontents

    Susan George
    16 November 2015
    Article

    I can only see progress—technological, political, social, moral, whatever—as a goal of human action and since progress has no will or direction of its own and depends entirely on what people do or don’t do, it’s neither contented or discontented about anything. As judges of the direction human affairs and the world are taking I am, and practically everyone I know is mightily discontented with the cumulative effects of changes brought about over the past several decades.

  3. Open Letter to Presidents of Council, Commission and Parliament on VolksWagen scandal

    09 November 2015
    Declaration

    Over 39 organisations write an open letter to the presidents of European Council, Commission and Parliament to address their concerns on the agenda in favour of cutting compliance costs and replacing the role of the public regulator with corporate co- and self-regulation. The dieselgate scandal, caused by a will to cut compliance costs, shows that the human and economic consequences of weak rules and lenient enforcement of environmental laws are enormous.

  4. The Treaty on TNC's and the Struggle to stop Corporate Impunity

    Gonzalo Berrón
    21 October 2015
    Article

    On June 26, 2014, under the leadership of Ecuador and South Africa, the UN Human Rights Council passed landmark resolution 26/9,2 establishing an open-ended inter - governmental working group (IGWG)3 that is mandated to elaborate an international legally binding instrument on transnational corporations (TNCs) and other business enterprises with respect to human rights (hereinafter, the Treaty). It was a tight vote: the resolution was supported by 20 states, mainly from Africa and Asia, and opposed by 14, including the United States and the European Union, with 13 abstentions. The resolution strikes a nerve — and there is much expectation around it.

  5. #OccupyUNSquare Social Movements at the United Nations Human Rights Council defend a Binding Treaty for Transnational Corporations

    20 July 2015
    Article

    Social Movements from all over the world came to Geneva (6-10 July) to support a binding treaty on transnational corporations and other business enterprises to respect Human Rights discussed for the 1st time in the United Nations Human Rights Council.