Search results

16 items
  1. The social cost of private water: what are the options?

    Satoko Kishimoto, Georgi Medarov
    10 December 2015
    Multi-media

    A return to public forms of administration in water supplies is a phenomenon that has been spreading globally. Over the past 15 years almost 235 cities around the world, among them Paris, Berlin, Budapest, Buenos Aires and Kuala Lumpur have either terminated or have desisted from renewing the contracts with private concessionary companies. In the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria and the Scandinavian countries, for example, water delivery is, by a tradition, almost 100 percent public.

  2. Jakarta’s Water Services Violate the Human Right to Water

    Irfan Zamzami
    10 December 2015
    Article

    After 18 years of underperforming private management, water services in Jakarta could be returning to public management to guarantee the human right to water in accordance with the Central Jakarta District Court ruling of 24 March 2015, which annulled the current contract agreements.

  3. The meaning, relevance and scope of energy democracy

    Daniel Chavez
    09 October 2015
    Article

    What does the concept of energy democracy offer to the struggle against climate change and energy poverty?

  4. Privatisation of urban water supply: The muddy picture

    29 September 2015
    In the media

    The Indian Express - The municipal body’s financial losses from water works has reportedly increased by Rs 60 crore per annum, leading to demands, from both opposition parties and the local community, for the ouster of the private player.

  5. Reversing the Tide: Cities and Countries Are Rebelling Against Water Privatization, and Winning

    25 September 2015
    In the media

    Thruthout - Private companies have been working to make a profit from water since the 1600s, when the first water companies were established in England and Wales. The first wave of water privatization occurred in the 1800s, and by the mid- to late-19th century, privately owned water utilities were common in Europe, the United States and Latin America, and began to appear in Africa and Asia.

  6. The Global Fight Over Our Drinking Water Is Just Getting Started

    02 September 2015
    In the media

    The Nation -  Water is an essential natural element, but around the world, it’s also an artificially endangered resource.

  7. Learning from the past: Public finance and democratic control are key to achieving the SDGs

    Satoko Kishimoto, David Boys
    15 July 2015
    Article

    The question of how to finance water and sanitation is crucial. Leading international institutions emphasise the role of private finance despite major concerns. The idea that private finance can bring the needed investment is remarkably persistent in global policy circles and leads to a dangerous lack of attention to the far more realistic option of mobilising public finance for infrastructure to provide essential services for all.

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    Booting Corporate Power, Communities Are Taking Back Control of Their Water

    Andrea Germanos
    20 April 2015
    In the media

    Common Dreams - New research puts spotlight on 'story that's crying to be told.'

  9. The mirage of public-private water

    Satoko Kishimoto
    14 April 2015
    Article

    Public-private partnerships were heralded as a solution to the millions who still lack access to water, but after two decades the evidence is in: they have failed. An unprecedented surge of cities is now bringing water back under public control.

  10. Our Public Water Future

    • Satoko Kishimoto, Emanuele Lobina, Olivier Petitjean
    03 April 2015
    Book

    Privatisation on the backfoot as new book shows that the growing wave of cities putting water back under public control has now spread to 37 countries impacting 100 million people.

  11. Jakarta Court cancels World's biggest Water Privatisation after 18 year Failure

    25 March 2015
    Press release

    The Central Jakarta District Court on 24 March annulled the water privatisation contracts of Suez (PT PAM Lyonnaise Jaya – Palyja) and Aetra, finding that the Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) were negligent in fulfilling the human right to water for Jakarta’s residents.

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    How Civil Society helped block World Bank to privatise water

    Ben Ezeamalu
    19 February 2015
    In the media

    The Premium Times - The announcement sent a collective sigh of relief to the water corporation staff and civil society activists. After months of negotiation on how to privatize the water supply in Lagos, between the World Bank and the Lagos Water Corporation, the bank has called off the talks.

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    Water and Power: Are public services still public?

    11 February 2015
    Multi-media

    Public water and electricity are back in vogue. Yet many state-owned utilities are now undergoing €œcorporatisation€: they have legal autonomy and manage their own finances. Is this a positive development in the struggle for equitable public services? Or a slippery slope toward privatization?

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    Water privatisation: a worldwide failure?

    John Vidal
    03 February 2015
    In the media

    Lagos is among the many cities in the global south where investment in water supplies is desperately needed, yet there is no consensus on whether the answer lies with private management, the public sector, or a combination of both.

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    The Eve of De-Privatisation in Jakarta

    14 January 2015
    Report

    Jakarta is currently striving to join many cities around the world and remunicipalising its water. A series of fact-sheets that outline how and why water privatisation failed and the potential for a renewed effective public service.

  16. REM failed privatization Bolivia

    Remunicipalisation

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Why are people around the world reclaiming essential services from private operators and bringing their delivery back into the public sphere? There are many motivations behind (re)municipalisation initiatives: a goal to end private sector abuse or labour violations; a desire to regain control over the local economy and resources; a wish to provide people with affordable services; or an intention to implement ambitious climate strategies.