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    Public Public Partnerships

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    TNI is advocating Public Public Partnerships (PUP) as an alternative policy to privatisation or to Public-Private Partnerships in water services as well as a concrete tool to work with partners to reform public water companies/utilities, improve services and realise the right to water on the ground. A public-public partnership (PUP) is simply collaboration between two or more public authorities or organizations, based on solidarity, to improve the capacity and effectiveness of one partner in providing public water or sanitation services. They have been described as a “peer relationship forged around common values and objectives, which exclude profit-seeking”. PUPs avoid the risks which are typically encountered in public-private partnerships: transaction costs, contract failure, renegotiation, the complexities of regulation, commercial opportunism, monopoly pricing, commercial secrecy, currency risk, and lack of public legitimacy. In general the objectives of PUPs are to improve the capacity of the assisted partner. In practice, PUPs' work can be divided into five broad categories: training and developing human resources, technical support on a wide range of issues, improving efficiency and building institutional capacity, financing water services, improving participation. Public Community Partnerships Public-communitarian partnerships (PCPs) are internationally referred to as public-public partnerships but PCPs has a stronger connotation of community. While government and public water authorities should adopt and implement a water delivery policy that prioritises serving the needs of rural communities, many state-owned utilities fail to serve hard-to-reach areas. Community-based water systems are bridging the gap in water service delivery in many parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. TNI has observed new forms of partnerships between public authorities and rural communities, in which the communities are engaged in the decision-making about water solutions, supported with public funding and expertise and are empowered to take responsibility for running water systems. Such partnerships can bring rapid and lasting improvements.

  2. Our Public Water Future

    • Satoko Kishimoto, Emanuele Lobina, Olivier Petitjean
    03 April 2015
    Book

    Privatisation on the backfoot as new book shows that the growing wave of cities putting water back under public control has now spread to 37 countries impacting 100 million people.

  3. Public Services under Attack

    • Thomas Fritz
    12 October 2015
    Report

    The aggressive agenda of services corporations, with regards to TTIP and CETA, pushes for far-reaching market opening in areas such as health, cultural and postal services, and water, which would allow them to enter and dominate the markets. Those in charge of EU trade negotiations are rolling out the red carpet for the services industry, with CETA and TTIP reflecting the wishlist of corporate lobbyists.

  4. Public policies under attack

    Lori Wallach
    05 November 2015
    Multi-media
  5. Democratic Public Services

    01 January 2015
    Topic
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    Water and Power: Are public services still public?

    11 February 2015
    Multi-media

    Public water and electricity are back in vogue. Yet many state-owned utilities are now undergoing €œcorporatisation€: they have legal autonomy and manage their own finances. Is this a positive development in the struggle for equitable public services? Or a slippery slope toward privatization?

  7. Lawyers subverting the public interest

    • Cecilia Olivet, Pietje Vervest, Pia Eberhardt, Fabian Flues
    15 April 2015
    Policy briefing

    In response to growing public criticism of international investment law, a new lobby group has emerged, EFILA, seeking to influence European officials. This briefing exposes how EFILA represents an attempt by the arbitration industry to fend off much-needed reforms in order to protect a highly lucrative business.

  8. Romila Thapar

    Why we need public intellectuals

    Praful Bidwai
    13 July 2015
    Opinion
  9. Public and Community Partnership in the Americas

    28 January 2015
    Multi-media

    A Uruguayan public utility and union has joined up community-based water managers in Bolivia and Colombia in order to strengthen public and communitarian management of water and stop privatisation.

  10. The hidden Citizens' Revolution for Public Water

    Satoko Kishimoto
    16 April 2015
    Article

    Growing numbers of communities are reversing past privatizations in the public sector and delivering even better public services in the process.

  11. Lowe wants public sector cooperation on ganja

    28 February 2015
    Other news

    Executive Chairman of Medicanja, Dr Henry Lowe, is urging a spirit of cooperation between government ministries and agencies involved in the development of Jamaica's ganja industry, following the passage of the Decriminalisation Bill.

  12. cover_book_launch

    Book launch "Corporate conduct & the public interest"

    30 September 2015 - Event

    Book launch "Corporate conduct & the public interest"

  13. Rethinking Corporatization and Public Services in the Global South

    16 March 2015
    Book

    After three decades of privatization and anti-state rhetoric, government ownership and public management are back in vogue.

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    Why is public banking important for social change?

    30 September 2015
    Multi-media

    Thomas Marois, Senior Lecturer in Development Studies argues that until people regain control of money and credit, we will not be able to stop economic and ecological crises. Most people don't know that fortunately there is untapped potential in public banks, that make up a quarter of all banks worldwide. Drawing on his research on public banks in Turkey, Costa Rica and elsewhere, Marois points to the potential and problems of public banks and how we might harness them to deliver social and environmental justice.

  15. The mirage of public-private water

    Satoko Kishimoto
    14 April 2015
    Article

    Public-private partnerships were heralded as a solution to the millions who still lack access to water, but after two decades the evidence is in: they have failed. An unprecedented surge of cities is now bringing water back under public control.

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