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  1. Hands On The Land

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Hands on the Land for Food Sovereignty is a collective coalition by 16 partners, including peasants and social movements, development and environmental NGOs, human rights organisations and research activists aiming to conduct activities in Europe to raise awareness on issues related to the use and governance of land, water and other natural resources and its effects on the realization of the right to food and food sovereignty. In the context of food insecurity and climate change, the governance of natural resources requires addressing the core questions of who ought to have what rights to which resources, for what purposes and who ought to decide from a social justice-based rather than profit making-led perspective. This requires putting the visions and aspirations of those at the frontline of struggles for food sovereignty, whether they be small-scale fishing communities, peasants, pastoralists, indigenous peoples, young and prospective farmers, as well as the most vulnerable and marginalised, at the heart of policies which affect them.

    Read more on the Hands on the Land website.

  2. Flex Crops

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The convergence of multiple crises (food, energy and fuel, climate and financial) in the midst of the rise of newer hubs of global capital (BRICS countries and some middle income countries) – and the various responses to these by states and corporations – have paved the way for the emergence of ‘flex crops and commodities’. Flex crops and commodities are those that have multiple and/or flexible uses: food, animal feed, fuel, and other commercial-industrial uses. In fact the contemporary global land rush is intertwined with the rise of flex crops and commodities: sites of large-scale land deals tend to be sites of expansion of production of these crops and commodities, e.g. soya, sugarcane, palm oil, corn, cassava, industrial trees. The issues are compelling and urgent, yet still largely under-researched. What are the implications of this phenomenon for how scholars, civil society and grassroots social movements undertake ‘engaged research’, public actions and policy advocacy around agrarian justice issues?

  3. Renewables

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Increasing renewable energy is critical to ending fossil-fuel dependency and providing energy for all, but it is critical it is not done in a way that dispossesses communities, benefits only corporations and a rich elite, and causes further environmental damage.

  4. World Health Organization (WHO)

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is the agency within the United Nations specialized in international public health; its primary objective is to facilitate the attainment of highest possible level of health among all peoples. The UN drug control treaties of 1961 and 1971 mandate the WHO to conduct scientific and medical review of substances proposed to be (re-)scheduled. The main role of the Expert Committee of Drug Dependence (ECDD) of the WHO, in this case, is to evaluate the medical properties of a particular substance in relation with its liability for abuse, while taking into account its medical purposes. Recently, for instance, the WHO recommended the re-scheduling of dronabinol from Schedule II to Schedule III of the 1971 Convention, and advised against the scheduling of ketamine.

     

  5. The Drug Law Reform - Expert Seminars

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The Drug Law Reform project organises a series of expert seminars, drug policy briefings and informal drug policy dialogues. The activities serve to cross-fertilise policy debates between countries and regions, stimulating participants to exchange experiences and learn lessons between policy officials, representatives from international agencies and nongovernmental experts and practitioners. Seminars are held under Chatham House Rule to ensure confidentiality and to allow participants a free exchange of ideas.

  6. Democratic Public Services

    01 January 2015
    Topic
  7. Producers of Crops

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    TNI’s Drugs & Democracy programme has dedicated a large share of its attention on (national and international) drug control policies towards crop cultivation and alternative development. In doing so, the programme works closely with - representatives and/or families of - producers of cannabis, opium, and coca, whose voices are often left out from the policymaking arenas. Furthermore, the programme aims to build bridges between crop producing communities and important stakeholders such as civil society or nongovernmental organisations, community leaders, and policymakers - as an integral part of the programme’s efforts to advocate for more humane and inclusive approaches guided by the principles of human rights, development, and harm reduction.

  8. A woman attends her produce post in a market in zone 3, Guatemala City.

    Trade & Investment Alternatives

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The Alternative Trade Mandate Alliance is an alliance of currently almost 50 organisations, developing an alternative vision of European trade policy that puts people and planet before big business.

  9. This photo is from an investigative report from Rainforest Action Network that presents evidence that Cargill is operating two undisclosed palm oil plantations in West Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Land and Water Grabbing

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    In recent years, various actors, from big foreign and domestic corporate business and finance to governments, have initiated a large-scale worldwide enclosure of agricultural lands, mostly in the Global South but also elsewhere. This is done for large-scale industrial and industrial agriculture ventures and often packaged as large-scale investment for rural development. But rather than being investment to benefit the majority of rural people, especially the poorest and most vulnerable, this process constitutes a new wave of land and water ‘grabbing’. It is a global phenomenon whereby the access, use and right to land and other closely associated natural resources is being taken over - on a large-scale and/or by large-scale capital – resulting in a cascade of negative impacts on rural livelihoods and ecologies, human rights, and local food security.

  10. Sulphur Mining at Kawah Ijen

    Corporate Impunity

    01 January 2015
    Topic
  11. Dismantle Corporate Power

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The initiative to build a global campaign to dismantle corporate power and end TNCs’ impunity came from the network of organizations, movements, campaigns and affected communities that built the campaign process on European TNCs in Latin America together with the Permanent People’s Tribunal (PPT) and the Bi-regional Europe-Latin America and the Caribbean Enlazando Alternativas Network. Since late 2011, organisations from the network together with campaign organisations from different global regions have been promoting the campaign-building process. As of June 2012, over 100 organisations and movements from around the world have signed on to the campaign. For more information go to the website of Dismantle Corporate Power

  12. Shan Market in Pyin Oo Lwin

    Myanmar Commentary

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Given the exceptional time of change in Myanmar, in the coming months the Transnational Institute will be putting out occasional commentaries, both by TNI and invited individuals, to reflect the challenges of a land in transition. This will be in addition to TNI’s regular Briefing and Report series. These commentaries are intended to contribute broader understanding to the many challenges facing the country and its peoples as a new parliament and government take office in 2016.

    See the complete list of all the Myanmar commentaries.

    These commentaries are part of a TNI project funded by Sweden. These commentaries are part of a TNI project funded by Sweden. Opinions expressed by authors are not necessarily the views of the donor.

  13. Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Myanmar is one of the most ethnically diverse countries in the world. While making up to 40 per cent of the population, ethnic minority groups have long been marginalised and denied basic rights due to decades of civil war and competing economic interests in areas and resources on which many nationality peoples depend for survival. TNI’s work in this field centralises around promoting the active role of ethnic-based civil society organisations in peace, reform and policy-making processes.

  14. Cannabis

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The status of cannabis in the UN drug conventions is controversial. It is now scheduled among the most dangerous substances. How and why did cannabis get in the conventions? Does it belong there? What are the options to review the status of cannabis according to current scientific data? Is making cannabis subject to a control regime similar to harmful substances like alcohol and tobacco a solution?

  15. Drug Policy in Myanmar

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    In Myanmar, TNI has long focused on opium production and its relation with drug policies in the country. Together with civil society organisations, such as the Myanmar Opium Farmers Forum, TNI analyses and proposes alternatives to repressive supply reduction policies, including forced eradication, whose socio-economic repercussions are mainly endured by poppy growing communities residing in areas afflicted by conflict and poverty. In advancing drug law reform in Myanmar, TNI works closely with local organisations including the Drug Policy Advocacy Group (DPAG) Myanmar, to promote human rights and harm reduction for people who use drugs.

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