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5 items
  1. ISDS in numbers

    • Cecilia Olivet, Bettina Müller, Luciana Ghiotto
    11 December 2017
    Report

    How fair is the investment arbitration system in Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries? Are investor-state disputes balanced between national and corporate interests? LAC countries are among the most affected by the investment arbitration system, representing 28.6% of all known investor-state disputes around the world. In particular, Argentina, Venezuela, Mexico, Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru account for 77.3% of the total number of claims against LAC countries. Analysis shows that the system so far heavily favours corporate interests. Investors have won in 70% of the cases brought against LAC countries. As a result, LAC States have already had to pay foreign companies 20.6 billion USD, which could cover Bolivia’s budget for health and education for four whole years.

  2. Human Rights as a Key Issue in the Indonesia-EU Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement

    • Rachmi Hertanti
    07 September 2017
    Report

    This paper explores the potential impacts of an Indonesia-EU CEPA on human rights in Indonesia and the state’s duty to protect human rights.

  3. TiSA and the Threat to Public Banks

    • Thomas Marois
    21 April 2017
    Report

    The Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA) is an attack on the future publicness of public banking around the world. 

  4. Social justice at bay

    • Maarten Bakker, Satoko Kishimoto, Christa Nooy
    21 April 2017
    Report

    Projects protecting Jakarta against floods are likely to damage the environment and could threaten the livelihoods of tens of thousands of people. The Dutch government, supporting these projects, should question how it balances its interest in supporting Dutch companies with its stated policies of sustainable and inclusive development. 

  5. Keep the Farm TTIP- and CETA-free!

    • Guus Geurts
    19 January 2017
    Report

    In both TTIP and CETA food, agriculture, animal husbandry and horticulture play a major role and the prospects for European farmers and consumers are not good. TTIP negotiators are discussing abolishing or lowering import tariffs for agricultural products and the mutual recognition of each others’ standards relating to environment, animal welfare, food safety and labour rights is on the agenda.