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176 items
  1. Commons Transition and P2P

    • Michel Bauwens, Vasilis Kostakis, Stacco Troncoso, Ann Marie Utratel
    09 May 2017
    Primer

    How do we define the Commons? And how can the concept be used to achieve social, political and economic change? This primer explores the potential of the Commons together with Peer to Peer (P2P) to form a system based on the needs of civil society and its environment. This offers a viable alternative to obsolete, centrally planned systems or the amorality of market economies. We look at how basing civil society on P2P dynamics and Commons practices could enable a more egalitarian, just, and environmentally sustainable society.

  2. Keep the Farm TTIP- and CETA-free!

    • Guus Geurts
    19 January 2017
    Report

    In both TTIP and CETA food, agriculture, animal husbandry and horticulture play a major role and the prospects for European farmers and consumers are not good. TTIP negotiators are discussing abolishing or lowering import tariffs for agricultural products and the mutual recognition of each others’ standards relating to environment, animal welfare, food safety and labour rights is on the agenda.

  3. Costa Rica’s Banco Popular

    Costa Rica’s Banco Popular shows how banks can be democratic, green – and financially sustainable

    Thomas Marois
    14 September 2017
    Article

    A decade on from the 2007-08 global financial crisis, the majority of private banks have changed very little. Most remain solely concerned with maximising their returns, while sustainable or social goals remain subservient to this. For conventional economists, anything else remains an impossible or distant dream.

  4. How Public Banks Can Help Finance a Green and Just Energy Transformation

    • Thomas Marois
    15 November 2017
    Paper

    Every day public banks are developing new and innovative ways of financing a green transformation. This issue brief explores the lessons from two public banks, one in Costa Rica  and the other in Germany.

  5. Venezuela - Perspectives from the South

    • Santiago Arconada Rodríguez, Karina Arévalo, Javier Biardeau, Atilio A. Borón, Ana Esther Ceceña, Reinaldo Iturriza, Claudio Katz, Edgardo Lander, Miguel Mazzeo, Claudia Korol, Juan Carlos Monedero, Nildo Ouriques, Isabel Rauber, Maristella Svampa, Marco Teruggi, Zuleima Vergel, Raúl Zibechi
    10 August 2017
    Report

    Venezuela is passing through a period of acute political, economic and social turmoil, which has intensified the debate within the regional and global left about the nature, the legacy and the prospects of the Bolivarian process.

     

  6. Why does the UK Data Protection Bill exempt the ‘risk profiling’ industry?

    Ben Hayes, Ravi Naik
    31 October 2017
    Article

    Anyone trying to open a bank account or send money overseas must undergo extensive risk assessment by private data-brokers, which amass non-credible data and falsely blacklist the wrong people on a speculative basis.

  7. Why did Ecuador terminate all its Bilateral investment treaties?

    Cecilia Olivet
    25 May 2017
    Article

    On 16 May, Ecuador became the fifth country to terminate all its Bilateral investment treaties (BIT). Why did it make this decision? TNI researcher Cecilia Olivet, and president of the Ecuadorian Citizens Commission that audited the country’s investment protection treaties, shares her insider perspective.

  8. Culture of the Commons

    Mayo Fuster Morell
    27 January 2017
    Article

    Mayo Fuster Morell, responsible for BarCola, a group working on collaborative economy policies in Barcelona, shares her thoughts and experiences on how commons-based forms of collaboration can build a more just society.

  9. Standing Rock Water Protectors Dutch tour

    28 May 2017

    Across the Standing Rock Reserve, the heartland of the original American Sioux tribe, an oil pipeline is being constructed, threatening access to clean water for many. There is a strong opposition among the residents. In the Netherlands there are also fights against fossil fuel energy, damage to buildings through gas extraction and nuclear power plants. Connect with activists from Standing Rock during a tour across the Netherlands.

  10. No TAV: feeding the fire of resistance in northern Italy

    Frank Barat
    21 November 2017
    Article

    The decades-old struggle of the No TAV movement in northern Italy is an inspiration to environmentalist and anti-capitalist movements worldwide.

  11. It is both necessary and possible to develop an alternative to globalisation

    Walden Bello
    25 July 2017
    Article

    The Left spent its energies diagnosing the ills of globalisation. Then why does a regressive Right get to reap the benefits of its waning popularity?

  12. The deadly consequences of Europe’s border militarization

    23 January 2017
    Article

    While border militarisation has been disastrous for refugees, it also has its winners. Most notably, it has provided a booming business for the defense, security and IT industries in a market that is growing at roughly 8% a year.

  13. Power and patriarchy

    Elizabeth Peredo Beltran
    06 January 2017
    Article

    After more than a decade of processes that brought hope to the progressive world, several developments in Latin America in 2016 suggest we have reached the end of a cycle of left-wing victories in the region. This is a crisis that offers pointers and important lessons for us all, about the dynamics of social transformation and about ourselves as activists.

  14. Ómar with his coffee plants

    Coca and the Colombian Peace Accords

    Martin Jelsma, Coletta Youngers
    11 August 2017
    Article

    Getting to the Briceño region in the heart of Antioquia requires an excellent vehicle, and a lot of time and luck. The week before our journey there in mid-July, heavy rains wiped out part of the road between Briceño and Pueblo Nuevo, stranding folks on one side or the other. We were lucky on the day of our journey – no rain. But it took a six-hour drive to get from Medellín to Briceño, and another three hours of sometimes harrowing curves to Pueblo Nuevo. The dirt-road drive itself was a stark reminder of the challenges Colombia faces as it seeks to eliminate 50,000 hectares of coca this year through the crop substitution program, Programa Nacional Integral de Sustitución de Cultivos de Uso Ilícito (National Comprehensive Program for the Substitution of Illicit Crops), known by the acronym PNIS.

  15. The War on Terrorism Financing and Its Consequences for Civil Society

    Ben Hayes
    30 August 2017
    Article

    This summer, Women Peacemakers Program staff interviewed Ben Hayes, a researcher on topics such as security policy, counterterrorism, border control and surveillance, about his current work. Ben Hayes has been one of the first to research and write extensively on how countering terrorism financing (CTF) policies have been affecting the right to freedom of association and financial access for nonprofits, and the role of intergovernmental institutions such as the Financial Action Task Force (FATF)[1] in these phenomena. In this interview, he talks about how this topic first came to his attention, current trends in trying to craft solutions for the obstacles faced by nonprofits, as well as his take on what it will take to move forward.

  16. Staff

    21 March 2017

    TNI's staff

  17. Resistance in Honduras

    03 February 2017

    Join us to hear Tomas Gomez Membreno, the current coordinator of the Honduran organisation COPINH, share the story of his community's struggle.

  18. Colombian landscape

    Human nature as victim in Colombia

    Lyda Fernanda Forero
    17 March 2017
    Article

    "We are part of nature – human and non-human. The relationship between both and in permanent interaction creates ‘the territory’."

  19. Water is a right protest in US

    The power of a transformative city

    Sol Trumbo Vila, Nick Buxton
    10 October 2017
    Article

    The local was where democracy was born; it is now where we will recover it

  20. Opinion: PPPs lead to dangerous debts for developing countries

    María José Romero, Mathieu Vervynckt
    01 March 2017
    Opinion

    For many years, public-private partnerships have been promoted by governments and financial institutions as a way to pay for development projects such as roads, schools and hospitals.

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