Search results

134 items
  1. Methamphetamine use in Myanmar, Thailand, and Southern China: assessing practices, reducing harms

    • Renaud Cachia, Thura Myint Lwin
    18 February 2019
    Policy briefing

    Over the past decade, methamphetamine use has grown more popular in Myanmar, Thailand and Southern China. Based on in-depth interviews conducted with individuals who use methamphetamine, this briefing sheds light on the importance of promoting an environment that reinforces, rather than undermines, the ability of people who use methamphetamine to regulate their drug use, preserve their health and adopt safer practices.

  2. Spanish municipal elections

    Sol Trumbo Vila
    05 June 2019
    Article

    With the results still playing out, the survival of parties like Barcelona en Comú will depend on their ability to bring together the ‘three souls’ of the movement.

  3. The Challenges of Medicinal Cannabis in Colombia

    • Nicolás Martínez Rivera
    29 October 2019
    Policy briefing

    In July 2016, the Colombian government enacted Law 1787, which regulates the use of medicinal cannabis and its trade in the country. With this decision and a series of subsequent resolutions, Colombia joined the more than a dozen countries that have put into practice different types of regulation to explore the advantages of this plant as an alternative pharmaceutical.

  4. Media Review 2018

    07 January 2019
    In the media
  5. A View from the Countryside

    • Katie Sandwell, Angélica Castañeda Flores, Lyda Fernanda Forero, Jennifer Franco, Sofia Monsalve Suárez, Andrea Nuila, Philip Seufert
    10 December 2019
    Policy issue

    We urgently need new, revitalised, visions of human rights, and rural communities are in the process of building just these kinds of visions. The climate crisis poses massive threats to human rights, but so do mainstream technical and economic climate ‘solutions’, and rising authoritarian voices around the world. The battle for resources and territories, including land, water, fisheries, and forests is becoming increasingly intense, with land-intensive renewable energy projects and the drive to marketise carbon and biodiversity additional threats to nature and to the livelihoods of rural and indigenous people around the world.

  6. Guarding the fortress

    • Ainhoa Ruiz Benedicto
    26 November 2019
    Report

    The report focuses on 19 Frontex operations run by the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (hereafter Frontex) to explore how the agency is militarising borders and criminalising migrants, undermining fundamental rights to freedom of movement and the right to asylum.

     
  7. Save the Irrawaddy by Offering Compensation

    Lahpai Seng Raw
    09 May 2019
    Article

    Controversy continues over a suspended mega-dam project, backed by China, on the Irrawaddy River in Kachin State. The social and environmental consequences of the proposed project cast a shadow not only over the local Kachin population but over all the nationalities of Myanmar. Public awareness is growing why protecting the Irrawaddy is of national importance.

  8. Our Oceans need a different approach

    Zoe Brent, Mads Barbesgaard, Carsten Pedersen
    24 October 2019
    Opinion

    Delegates to the Our Oceans conference are gathering to discuss ocean sustainability, but there’s a big problem: their proposals will only sanitize continued resource extraction and environmental and ecological degradation.

  9. Understanding Our Oceans

    Katie Sandwell
    23 October 2019
    Snapshot

    Six key reads to understand the rising pressure on ocean space.

  10. Políticas de Drogas y Acuerdo de Paz

    14 June 2019 - Event

    Una reunión de mesa redonda que busca una actualización de la situación en Colombia referente al tema de las políticas de drogas y (la implementación de) el Acuerdo de Paz.

  11. Selling the Silk Road Spirit

    07 November 2019
    Policy briefing

    This briefing aims to deepen discussion on the Belt and Road Iniatiative (BRI) in Myanmar. The BRI is often described as a ‘grand strategy’ led by President Xi Jinping, centrally planned and rolled out by obedient state-owned enterprises (SOEs). The sheer size of the initiative – 136 countries have received US$90 billion in Chinese foreign direct investment and exchanged US$6 trillion in trade with China - can make the BRI appear monolithic and inevitable. However, using a political economy analysis, this briefing demonstrates that the BRI is not a grand strategy, but a broad framework of activities that seek to address a crisis in Chinese capitalism. An examination of four BRI projects in Myanmar using Chinese language sources shows the extent of lobbying by Chinese SOEs and the Yunnan provincial government to promote the projects, with support from the central Chinese government.

  12. Hojas de coca

    Migrants and Traditional Use

    Pien Metaal, Constanza Sánchez, Natalia Rebollo
    25 April 2019
    Article

    How to reconcile migrant communities’ right to the enjoyment of cultural life (including the use of traditional plants) with international drug control obligations.

  13. International regulatory cooperation and the public good

    • Stuart Trew
    22 May 2019
    Report

    This report focuses on the significant threats to precautionary environmental, labour, consumer and public health policy from regulatory cooperation and “good regulatory practices” chapters within the EU-Canada Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), US–Mexico–Canada Agreement (USMCA), and the currently parked EU-U.S Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP).

  14. Left behind by Northern Ireland’s neoliberal peace

    Niamh Ni Bhriain
    06 May 2019
    Article

    Recent events have exposed how Northern Ireland hasn’t experienced peace as much as a cold war. The structural violence, legacy of conflict and democratic deficit can’t be left to dangerously smoulder any longer.

  15. Extractivism and resistance in North Africa

    • Hamza Hamouchene
    20 November 2019
    Report

    Northern African countries are key suppliers of natural resources to the global economy, from large- scale oil and gas extraction in Algeria and Tunisia, to phosphate mining in Tunisia and Morocco, to water-intensive agribusiness paired with tourism in Morocco and Tunisia. The commodification of nature and privatisation of resources entailed in these projects has led to serious environmental damages, and forced these countries into a subservient position in the global economy, sustaining and deepening global inequalities.

  16. "The UN is being turned into a public-private partnership"

    Harris Gleckman, Lynn Fries
    21 November 2019
    Multi-media

    Multistakeholderism has become a new buzzword for global governance, shaping standards for products, setting the rules for global initiatives and increasingly entering every arena of global governance including the UN. They are driven by transnational corporations to consolidate power and profits and have disturbing implications for democracy, accountability and for communities most affected by corporate human rights violations.

  17. “Not About Us Without Us”: Legitimate national land law making by design

    Transnational Institute (TNI)
    17 December 2019
    Article

    As the government meets to design a “roadmap” for developing the new national land law, TNI looks at how the situation has changed since the development of the National Land Use policy a few years ago and reflects on the issues at stake for millions of people across the country with rights to land in the current context. 

  18. Food production for profit illustration

    Growing power: Mega-Mergers and the fight for our food system

    • Katie Sandwell
    18 January 2019
    Report

    Giant corporations have taken control of our food. In the last two years, these companies have begun the process of merging and re-arranging themselves into just four colossal corporations. The larger these companies grow, the less we can control them. And the less control we have, the harder it is for us to build the kind of food system that more and more of us want: one that recognizes the value of people, respects the planet, and provides decent, dignified work. How did this happen, and what can we do about it?

    You can download the comic book here.

    See the reference list here.

  19. There Are no Nation-States, Only Corporate Global Governors

    Harris Gleckman
    04 June 2019
    Multi-media

    A new form of global governance is emerging in which corporations supersede states and voluntarism replaces accountability.

  20. Three Ways To Discipline Corporate Global Governors

    Harris Gleckman
    04 June 2019
    Multi-media

    No stakeholder-based global governance system comes close to matching the democratic legitimacy of a citizen-based and nation-state-based governance system, but there are ways global governance can and should be reformed.

Pages