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127 items
  1. 7 steps to build a democratic economy

    • James Angel
    20 February 2020

    Towns and cities stand at the heart of the new public future. Between 2000 and 2019, there were over 1400 new cases of “municipalisation” or “remunicipalisation”, the creation of new public enterprises run by local governments or the return of privatised enterprises to municipal hands. This trend occurred across 2400 locales in 58 countries. 

  2. Support. Don't Punish: Future of Drug Policing

    26 June 2020

    Support. Don't Punish. campaign is aiming to envision future drug policy scenarios, this time focusing on law enforcement. During this free webinar organised on the Global Day of Action, which is officially the International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, we will collectively focus on the future of drug policing and imagine effective ways for drug policy reform.

  3. Annual report 2019

    11 August 2020
    Annual report

    Dubbed the ‘year of protest’, 2019 saw millions of people take to the streets on every continent.

    There was plenty to protest. Deepening inequality, rising cost of living, autocratic governments, discrimination, and the concentration of wealth and power into fewer and fewer hands. Many protests were met with brutal repression, but this did not quell the fight for dignity and freedom. 

    TNI stood alongside and in support of these movements, as we have consistently done for all 46 years of our existence. We have provided research and logistical support and put forward proposals that can bring about social and ecological transformation. Read more.

  4. Covid capitalism report

    14 October 2020
    Article

    Between April and July 2020, Transnational Institute hosted a unique set of 12 global conversations to analyse the fallout from COVID-19 and to articulate the changes we need for a better world. The webinars took place in collaboration with allied organisations and partners around the globe, including AIDC and Focus on the Global South. This critical report pulls out the main analysis from those conversations, with a focus on the proposals and solutions put forward by activists and experts worldwide. We hope this report helps citizens and social movements analyse the crisis, inspires transnational solidarity and works towards the emergence of a more just world.

  5. The Future Is Public: Special Report from Amsterdam

    Laura Flanders
    13 February 2020
    Multi-media

    From Austria to Chile, Lagos to London, people are demanding policies that democratize economies and keep public resources in public hands. In just the last decade, more than 2,400 cities in 58 countries have brought privatized resources back under public control. Laura Flanders reports from Amsterdam at The Future is Public, a conference co-hosted by TNI that brings together hundreds of organizers, scholars, and government officials who are working to democratize their municipal and national economies.

  6. A World with Drugs: Legal Regulation through a Development Lens (Webinar Series)

    09 September 2020

    Drugs are a development issue. Let’s stop pretending that they’re not.

  7. Cannabis in Latin America

    13 February 2020
    Press release

    This research by the Research Consortium on Drugs and the Law (Colectivo de Estudios Drogas y Derecho, CEDD) analyzes a duality facing Latin America: the prohibitionist discourse and its effects on human rights persist, alongside reforms to laws and policies related to the use of cannabis.

  8. Events at the 63rd Session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs

    02 March 2020

    The 63rd Sesssion of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs takes place from 2nd to 6th March 2020. TNI and its partners will participate at this annual series of meetings and co-hosts five side events on 5th and 6th March 2020.

  9. ‘Treat us like human beings’ - Life story of a woman who uses drugs in Myanmar

    07 December 2020
    Article
    This commentary is part of the ten-day global campaign to end violence against women, in which the Drug Policy Advocacy Group – Myanmar (DPAG) also participates together with partners in Myanmar, including female sex workers, women living with HIV, and transgender people. DPAG’s campaign focuses on ending violence against women, including women who use drugs and other women facing intersecting inequalities. The campaign is coordinated by DPAG, and supported by the Sex Worker Network in Myanmar (SWIM), Myanmar Positive Women Network, Myanmar Youth Stars, and the Transnational Institute (TNI). For more information see DPAG’s Facebook page.
  10. Position Paper of the Fair Trade Cannabis Working Group in the Caribbean

    28 October 2020
    Paper

    The Position Paper "For inclusive business models, well designed laws and fair(er) trade options for small-scale traditional cannabis farmers” produced by The Fair(er) Trade Cannabis Working Group aims to contribute to the debate on finding sustainable and realistic solutions to the challenges posed by the developing cannabis industry, with a special focus on traditional and small scale farmers.

  11. Smokable cocaine markets in Latin America and the Caribbean

    • Ernesto Cortés Amador, Pien Metaal
    02 March 2020
    Report

    Smokable cocaines are commonly referred to as “the most harmful drug”, and considered not just a threat to public health, but also to public security in the urban centres of many large cities. As a result, its users are frequently subject to hostility and stigmatization.

  12. Stranger than fiction

    • Azfar Shafi , Asim Qureshi
    11 February 2020
    Report

    This publication compares Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) policies in Britain, France and the Netherlands - three European countries where Muslims form a minority. It also traces how, both through their overwhelming focus on Muslims, and by their nature as tools of lateral surveillance, they help institutionalise Islamophobic prejudice and suspicion.

  13. Situating small-scale fisheries in the global struggle for agroecology and food sovereignty

    • Irmak Ertör, Zoe Brent, David Gallar, Thibault Josse
    20 November 2020
    Report

    This report explores the politics and practices in small- scale fisheries that form part of the global struggle for agroecology and food sovereignty. 

  14. Riot Police, Ukraine

    Call for essays on military, police and coercive state power

    04 September 2020
    Article

    The Transnational Institute (TNI) in the Netherlands is issuing an open call for essays, accessible papers, infographics and artistic collaborations in English or Spanish for its State of Power report to be launched in late March 2021. The focus for our tenth annual edition is on the military, police and coercive state power. (Pitch/abstract deadline: 6 October)

  15. A Walled World

    • Ainhoa Ruiz Benedicto, Mark Akkerman, Pere Brunet
    18 November 2020
    Report

    Over the last 50 years, 63 border walls have been built worldwide. This report maps the walls that have led 6 out of 10 people in the world to live in a nation with one of these border walls, analysing the justifications for the walls, the growing militarisation of borders everywhere and the businesses that have profited.

  16. UN green lights medicinal cannabis but fails to challenge colonial legacy of its prohibition

    02 December 2020
    Press release

    Vienna, 2 December 2020

    • In a historic vote, the United Nations (UN) has finally recognised the medicinal value of cannabis.
    • A group of prominent drug policy organisations has welcomed the move, but also expressed disappointment that this reform does not go far enough, as cannabis remains categorised internationally alongside drugs like heroin and cocaine.
    • The review was revisiting cannabis scheduling decisions made in the 1950s, which were driven by prevailing racist and colonial attitudes, and not based on scientific evaluations. This has remained unchallenged.
  17. Muslim Women don’t need saving

    • Nawal Mustafa
    10 December 2020
    Paper

    Upon declaring a Global War on Terror in 2001, the US administration claimed that the “fight against terrorism was also a fight for the rights and dignity of women”. In the years that followed, western political discourse regularly referred to the need to “free” apparently oppressed Muslim women from the shackles of their religion and way of life, reviving political and societal debates about head coverings, integration, gender equality, secularism, and neutrality.

    Relying on Islamophobic stereotypes, and with no regard for the rights to freedom of expression or freedom of religion, laws and policies were introduced in a number of European countries, which banned the hijab and/ or niqab. In perhaps the most flagrent example of just how entrenched Islamophobia has become, European states, in effect, began legislating on Muslim women’s bodies, dictating which clothes they could or could not wear.

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