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63 items
  1. Flower seed

    Biofuelwatch

    Profile

    Biofuelwatch actively supports the campaign for an EU moratorium on agrofuels from large-scale monocultures. Agroenergy monocultures are linked to accelerated climate change, deforestation, the impoverishment and dispossession of local communities, bio-diversity losses, human rights abuses, water and soil degradation, loss of food sovereignty and food security.

  2. Flower seed

    Rising Tide North America

    Profile

    Rising Tide North America is part of the international Rising Tide grassroots network of groups and individuals who take direct action to confront the roots causes of climate change and promote local, community-based solutions to the climate crisis.

  3. Flower seed

    Global Justice Ecology Project

    Profile

    The mission of Global Justice Ecology Project, based in the US, is to build local, national and international alliances with action to address the common root causes of social injustice, economic domination and environmental destruction.

  4. Flower seed

    Sustainable Energy and Economy Network (SEEN)

    Profile

    The Sustainable Energy and Economy Network (SEEN) based in the US works in partnership with citizens groups nationally and globally on environment, human rights and development issues with a  focus on energy, climate change, environmental justice, gender equity, and economic issues, particularly as these play out in North-South relations.

  5. A foreseeable disaster

    • Helena Paul
    09 July 2013

    Why despite ten years of accumulating evidence on the social and environmental cost of agrofuels, does the European Commission persist with its failed policies? An analysis of the EU's bioeconomy vision, how it is fuelling land grabs in Africa, the agrofuels lobby that drives policy, and the alternative visions for energy that are being ignored.

  6. Agrofuels and the right to food in Latin America

    • Sofía Monsalve et al.
    26 May 2008

    The possible impact of agrofuels on the human right to adequate food for the most oppressed and marginalised social groups must be considered prior to applying policies and programmes that encourage the production, investment and trade of agrofuels.

  7. Flex trees

    • Markus Kröger
    20 June 2014
    Report

    Flex trees seem to offer timely opportunities for socio-environmentally sustainable solutions, but also present dangers, particularly if such changes accelerate the concentration of land and plantation-based development, whereby forests compete with and may replace food production.

  8. The Politics of Flexing Soybeans in China and Brazil

    • Gustavo de L. T. Oliveira, Mindi Schneider
    15 September 2014
    Report

    The trajectories of soy developments in Brazil and China are related despite moving largely in opposite directions.

  9. The Politics of Sugarcane flexing in Brazil and beyond

    • Ben McKay, Sérgio Sauer, Ben Richardson, Roman Herre
    15 September 2014
    Report

    Flex crops, spread over greater expanses of land, are increasingly interlinked through international exchange in food, feed and fuel. Brazilian exports of sugarcane ethanol to the US are in part influenced by the domestic US production of maize ethanol, which in turn is shaped by the price of feed and the soybean supply.

  10. The Politics of Flex crops and Commodities

    • Jennifer Franco, Jun Borras, Pietje Vervest, S. Ryan Isakson, Les Levidow
    20 June 2014
    Report

    Flex crops are crops that can be used for food, feed, fuel or industrial material. Their emergence as critical global commodities is integral to understanding today's agroindustrial economy. 

  11. The Sugarcane Industry and the global economic crisis

    • Maria Luisa Mendonça, Fabio T. Pitta, Carlos Vinicius Xavier
    18 July 2013
    Paper

    An examination of ethanol production in Brazil, highlighting the role of financial capital, the territorial expansion of agribusiness and the impacts on labour relations and indigenous peoples and peasant farmers.

  12. Agrofuels: Big Profits, Ruined Lives and Ecological Destruction

    • François Houtart
    15 June 2010
    Book

    The green potential of agrofuels has been wasted by businesses that put profits above environmental protection, which has led to an absurd situation where an energy source that should be sustainable actually increases human and ecological damage.

  13. Globalising Hunger

    • Thomas Fritz
    12 October 2011
    Report

    While the EU's Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) persists with its central focus of fostering competitiveness and exports of European agribusiness, it will continue to undermine small-scale farming and create greater food insecurity in the global South.

     
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    Agricultural Innovation: Sustaining what agriculture? For what European bio-economy?

    • Jennifer Franco, Lucia Goldfarb, David Fig, Les Levidow, S.M.Oreszczyn et al.
    23 February 2011
    Report

    The Europe 2020 strategy's promotion of resource-efficient technologies and market incentives as the solution for sustainable agriculture is contradicted by experience where techno-fixes and market pressures have increased overall demand on resources.

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    Political Dynamics of Land-grabbing in Southeast Asia: Understanding Europe's Role

    • Jun Borras, Jennifer Franco
    18 January 2011
    Report

    The European Union is a significant player in the widespread occurrence of land-grabbing in Southeast Asia; both through its corporate sector and public policies.

  16. The Politics of Agrofuels and Mega-land and Water deals

    • David Fig, Jun Borras, Sofia Monsalve Suárez
    29 June 2011

    The Procana Bioethanol project in Mozambique is a clear example of how agrofuel investments contribute rather than mitigate climate change, and are often accompanied by dispossession and impoverishment caused by landgrabbing.

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    Towards a Broader View of the Politics of Global Land Grabbing

    • Jennifer Franco, Jun Borras
    15 June 2010
    The spectre of a global land grab by foreign transnationals has captured media attention, but perhaps the bigger danger lies in the response by institutions like the World Bank, whose supposedly ameliorative measures are likely to entrench dispossession rather than prevent it.
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    Landgrabs, conflict and the agro-industrial complex

    Jun Borras
    22 June 2011
    Multi-media

    The latest research on landgrabbing exposes the myth of 'reserve agricultural land' and highlights the new economic players  behind the latest wave of dispossession across the South.

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    European trade policy and the food crisis in Africa

    Dot Keet
    12 May 2011
    Multi-media

    Dot Keet explains how IMF and World Bank policies have brought about the current food crisis in Africa, and why food sovereignty and local production are necessary to secure long term food security.

  20. Report condemns EU push for biomass-fuelled 'green economy' at Rio+20

    Daniel Hunter
    19 June 2012
    In the media

    EU plans to promote the replacement of fossil fuels with biomass could lead to hunger and environmental devastation, according to a report released by the World Development Movement and the Transnational Institute.

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