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8 items
  1. Understanding the Arab Spring

    Kamil Mahdi, Phyllis Bennis, Ben Hayes, Salwa Ismail, Shaheer George, Mehdi Lalou, Yao Graham
    21 June 2011
    Multi-media

    Middle East scholars join TNI fellows in a unique and fascinating discussion of the context of the democracy uprisings in the Middle East and the way it may shape the region for future generations.

  2. Another missed opportunity

    Manuel Pérez-Rocha
    31 March 2011
    Article

    Obama's trip to Latin America: about gaining economic advantages, ignoring historical and recent diplomatic interferences and strategically placed critisism.

  3. Get all US forces and mercenaries out of Iraq

    Kamil Mahdi
    15 November 2010
    Article
  4. Bye-bye peace process: Palestine comes to the UN

    Phyllis Bennis
    21 September 2011
    Article

    After 20 years of failed U.S. diplomacy based on protecting Israel’s occupation, the need to move to a new diplomacy rooted in international law and human rights remains a vital necessity.

  5. Is the Arab Spring a Black Swan?

    Richard Falk
    12 May 2011
    Article

    A recent comparison by top foreign policy thinkers in the US reveals the not so pro-democratic thinking that also goes on in Washington, referring to the emancipatory movements of the Arab Spring as a improbable "worst-case scenarios."

  6. Dissidents or traitors?

    Atilio Boron
    31 March 2010
    Article

    When the “free press” condemns the imprisonment of dissidents in Cuba, they fail to mention that similar attempts to overthrow countries with foreign help would also face imprisonment in most countries worldwide.

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    Video: Bennis on the Libya no-fly zone debate

    Phyllis Bennis
    17 March 2011
    Multi-media

    The international debate on imposing a no-fly zone in Libya has more to do with the politics of the New Middle East than with the protection of civilians.

  8. Libya And Beyond: What’s Next For Democracy?

    Phyllis Bennis
    28 February 2011
    Article

    The Gaddafi regime in Libya seems to believe that if a government crackdown is murderous enough, demonstrations will stop.