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  1. From War to Peace in Kayah (Karenni) State

    • Tom Kramer, Oliver Russell, Martin Smith
    29 June 2018
    Report
    Kayah State, historically known as “Karenni State”, is an example of the reform dilemmas that the ethnic nationality peoples in Myanmar face today. Although the country’s smallest state, it reflects many of the challenges in peace-building and socio-political transition that need resolution in Myanmar at large: political impasse, a multiplicity of conflict actors, contested natural resources, land grabbing, humanitarian suffering, and divided communities seeking to rebuild after more than six decades of civil war.
     
  2. Chronology on the Statue Case in Loikaw, Kayah State

    28 June 2019
    Article

    In this commentary, the Union of Karenni State Youth and LAIN Technical Support Group provide a chronology of events, outlining how arrests and the government’s handling of events have compounded rather than resolved political frustrations and inter-community understandings.

  3. Resolving ethnic conflict - Civic nationalism: a theoretical tool for the ending of civil war?

    Sai Wansai
    11 February 2020
    Article

    As the peoples of Myanmar commemorate Union Day this week, Sai Wansai argues that “civic nationalism” can help address the crisis in "ethnic nationalism" that underpins state failure and the enduring cycles of conflict in the country. Seventy-three years after the historic Panglong Agreement brought the new Union into being, Myanmar is a land that is yet to achieve ethnic peace and political inclusion.

  4. People’s War on Drugs in Kachin State: Indication of Failed Policies

    21 March 2016
    Article

    The creation of Pat Jasan and its ‘people’s war on drugs' have brought to light drug-related problems facing not only the Kachin State but also the rest of the country. Praised by some Kachin activists for finally addressing drug problems, they are also criticised by others for violating human rights and not providing any services to marginalised communities, including drug users and poppy farmers.

  5. Thumbnail

    Burma: Neither War Nor Peace

    05 July 2009
    Report

    Whilst a twenty year ceasefire still holds, there is unlikely to be peace and democracy in Burma without a political settlement that addresses ethnic minority needs and goals.

  6. The Generation to Enjoy Peace?

    Lahpai Seng Raw
    17 March 2016
    Article

    We are at a critical juncture in our history, more promising than at any time in recent memory. The country will have a civilian-majority government that came to office through the votes of a multitude of smaller nationality groups for a pan-national party promising political change. If this political transition is to succeed, poverty must be alleviated, corruption curtailed, drug abuse radically reduced, and a host of other social crises addressed that have long blighted our country.

  7. Is Myanmar's peace accord a sham?

    24 February 2016
    In the media

    IRIN - More than 5,000 civilians in Myanmar have been displaced in the past couple of weeks by heavy fighting between two ethnic armies, one of which signed a recent national ceasefire accord while the other was excluded.

  8. Burma’s Transition to Civilian Rule Hasn’t Stopped the Abuses of Its Ethnic Wars

    06 April 2016
    In the media

    TIME - Building an inclusive and durable cease-fire will present a major challenge for Burma's new government under the de facto leadership of Aung San Suu Kyi

  9. Demonstrations in Yangon on Union Day, 12 February 2021

    History repeated: Another roadblock to political change in Myanmar

    12 February 2021
    Article

    Today is Union Day in Myanmar, which marks the historic Panglong Agreement in February 1947 when the principles of equality and unity were drawn up for the future union. In 2021, however, it is not a day of celebration but one of protest as peoples across the country take to the street to demonstrate against the assumption of power by the military State Administrative Council. In this commentary, TNI analyses why the present crisis is so profound and why the patterns of military rule, state failure and ethnic conflict are in grave danger of being repeated. Peace and national reconciliation are required today, not at some indeterminate time in the future.

  10. Ruling party MPs return guns, alleged drug ties to 2015 race

    07 October 2015
    In the media

    The Irrawaddy - This November, several pro-government militia leaders elected in Burma’s 2010 election are seeking a return to office on the Union Solidarity and Development Party ticket.

  11. The right to land at crossroads in Myanmar

    Jennifer Franco
    05 July 2016
    Article

    What is the role of land in establishing lasting future peace in Myanmar? The country is at a crossroads, and facing rapid land polarization. However, the inauguration of a new government chosen by a landslide in historic elections offers an unprecedented opportunity to change course in a positive direction. An approach that prioritizes poor, vulnerable and marginalized groups especially ethnic nationalities, women, and youth, could lay a foundation for peace.

  12. Can we avoid more bloodshed? A reflection on the ethnic crisis in Myanmar

    15 June 2021
    Article

    After decades of conflict, it is often said that that political struggle in Myanmar has three groupings: military, pro-democracy and ethnic. But, as Cheery Zahau argues in this commentary, the ethnic nationality cause is frequently marginalised and misunderstood. Paradigm shifts in political behaviour and perspectives are required on all sides if the failures of the past are not to be repeated.

  13. Bridging conceptual differences vital to end ethnic conflict

    Sai Wansai
    04 April 2016
    Article

    While the first move of Aung San Suu Kyi has been to form a national reconciliation government, followed by restructuring, streamlining and planning so that her administration can function, the handling of the country’s faltering peace process has now risen to become one of the most urgent and essential challenges on the NLD's must-do list.

  14. Aung San Suu Kyi’s Visit to Beijing: Recalibrating Myanmar’s China Policy

    Yun Sun
    16 August 2016
    Article

    Aung San Suu Kyi and her NLD government faced a tough situation with China at the time of their inauguration in March. But, as she visits Beijing this week, hopes are high again in China that a redirection of Myanmar's foreign policy could be underway and the pendulum of Myanmar's balancing diplomacy is swinging back to the east. But many challenges lie ahead. These include resolution of the Myitsone dam impasse, repositioning political relations between the two countries, and peaceful settlement of ethnic conflicts in the Myanmar borderlands. The stakes are very high. The outcome of Aung San Suu Kyi's meetings could well come to define Myanmar-China relations for many years to come.

  15. Reflections on military coups in Myanmar: and why political actors in Arakan chose a different path

    Kyaw Lynn
    01 March 2021
    Article

    The 1 February coup by the military State Administration Council has caused protest and confusion in Myanmar and around the world. In this commentary, Kyaw Lynn puts in context the complexity of factors, personal as much as institutional, that preceded the military takeover during a difficult time for democratic progress on the international stage. He then looks at the critical situation in Rakhine State, examining why political trends have been different to other ethnic states and regions in the country.

  16. Journal of Peasant Studies: Special Forum on Myanmar

    26 April 2021
    Article
    Myanmar is in a dangerous and uncertain moment following the military coup on 1 February 2021. The articles in this Special Forum provide timely contextual analysis. Written before the coup, the articles delve into the politics of agrarian transformation in the context of (what was then) an ongoing (but fragile) opening up of political space.
  17. From Aspirations to Solutions

    • Burma Centrum Netherlands
    18 December 2013
    Report

    Hopes remain that, through political negotiation, democratic reforms will be achieved which lead to just and inclusive solutions. But as the countdown to the 2015 general election begins, concerns are growing that essential reforms will not be delivered.

  18. Arakan National Conference, Kyaukpyu, 2014

    Arakan (Rakhine State): A Land in Conflict on Myanmar’s Western Frontier

    • Martin Smith
    18 December 2019
    Report

    Rakhine State, historically known as Arakan, represents the post-colonial failures of Myanmar in microcosm: ethnic conflict, political impasse, militarisation, economic neglect and the marginalisation of local peoples. During the past decade, many of these challenges have gathered a new intensity, accentuating a Buddhist-Muslim divide and resulting in one of the greatest refugee crises in the modern world. A land of undoubted human and natural resource potential, Rakhine State has become one of the poorest territories in the country today.

  19. Civil society takes IPA concerns to EC

    19 January 2016
    In the media

    Myanmar Times - Over 500 Myanmar civil society organisations have voiced “deep concerns” about a prospective EU-Myanmar investment protection agreement (IPA).

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