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  1. TNI: Peace process raises hope for more effective and human drug policies

    10 June 2015
    In the media

    Shan Herald Agency for News - The Transnational Institute, has released another report saying the ongoing peace process has raised hope for more effective drug policies.

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    TNI: Peace process raises hope for more effective and human drug policies

    10 June 2015
    In the media

    Shan Herald Agency for News - The Transnational Institute, has released another report saying the ongoing peace process has raised hope for more effective drug policies.

  3. The opium bulbs of Myanmar: drug crop or lifeline for poor farmers?

    22 June 2016
    In the media

    The Guardian - Rural development programmes to wean poppy farmers off their illicit crop contend with lack of roads, water and power in remote areas plagued by militias

  4. Advocacy groups call for drug policy reset ahead of UN meeting

    07 April 2016
    In the media

    Myanmar Times - Repressive drug laws and corruption have contributed to Myanmar’s spiralling narcotics problem, according to advocacy groups, who are calling on the new government to launch a change of policy.

  5. Will Myanmar complete its transition towards an evidence-based approach to drug control?

    Renaud Cachia
    20 March 2018
    Article

    The recent publication of two single pieces of legislation - the amended 1993 Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Law and the first National Drug Control Policy - is likely to form the basis of Myanmar’s drug policy for several years to come. What does it mean for the country’s transition towards an evidence-based approach to drug control, and how can the gaps between the two documents be addressed?

  6. The 9th Asian Informal Drug Policy Dialogue

    31 May 2018
    Report

    In December 2017, the Transnational Institute (TNI) and Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development of Germany (BMZ), in collaboration with the Thai Office of the Narcotics Control Board (ONCB) and the Mae Fah Luang Foundation under Royal Patronage (MFLF), jointly organised the 9th Asian Informal Drug Policy Dialogue (IDPD) in Chiang Rai, Thailand. 

  7. Guiding Drug Law Reform in Myanmar

    • Drug Policy Advocacy Group
    29 November 2017
    Report

    A draft bill amending Myanmar 1993 Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Law was published in newspapers in March 2017 for public consultation. It was subsequently discussed in the upper house of Parliament (Amyothar Hluttaw) on 16 August 2017.

  8. Will Myanmar lead drug policy reform in Southeast Asia?

    Renaud Cachia
    06 September 2017
    Article

    Myanmar is better known for its serious drug problems - including large-scale illicit drugs production and trafficking and high rates of heroin use - than for implementing progressive drug policies that prioritise the health of its population. However, this could change in the near future.

  9. Opium Farmers in Myanmar: The Lives of Producers of Prohibited Plants

    Sai Lone
    17 December 2018
    Article

    The problem of opium should not be perceived only as a simple, black-and-white, law enforcement problem. To address problems related to opium cultivation, substantial socio-economic development is required to provide meaningful alternatives for farmers, and to ensure that a humanitarian crisis will not occur as the consequence of repressive drug control policies.

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    Drugs and Conflict in Burma

    01 December 2005
    Article

    Burma

    Burma

    Burma/Myanmar is undergoing yet another humanitarian crisis while entering a new critical political stage. In the Kokang region, an opium ban was enforced in 2003, and since mid-2005 no more poppy growing has been allowed in the Wa region. Banning opium in these Shan State regions where most of the Burmese opiates were produced, adds another chapter to the long and dramatic history of drugs, conflict and human suffering.

  11. The Land-Drugs Nexus in Myanmar

    Tom Kramer
    06 August 2015
    Multi-media

    Farmers in Myanmar use opium as a cash crop, “because they cannot grow enough food to feed their families for the whole year”.

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    Burma: Neither War Nor Peace

    05 July 2009
    Report

    Whilst a twenty year ceasefire still holds, there is unlikely to be peace and democracy in Burma without a political settlement that addresses ethnic minority needs and goals.

  13. Statement of Kachin State drug users

    15 December 2016
    Declaration

    Drug users from Kachin came together last November to discuss the challenges and difficulties they experience and identify possible solutions to their problems. Read their statement and recommendations. 

  14. Women and drugs in Myanmar: Beyond harm reduction

    Dania Putri
    08 March 2018
    Article

    In Myanmar’s Kachin State, a women’s drop-in centre has transformed into more than just a harm reduction facility. Leading up to International Women’s Day, we spoke with Thinzar Tun (AHRN Myanmar) about what makes this centre special.

  15. Statement from the 7th Myanmar Opium Farmers' Forum

    Myanmar Opium Farmers Forum (MOFF)
    10 May 2019
    Declaration

    During 8-10 May 2019, representatives from Kayan, Kayah, Pa-O, Shan, Lahu and Kachin opium farming communities came together to discuss their challenges in life and find ways to solve their problems.

  16. Film: Opium Farmer

    Myanmar Opium Farmers Forum (MOFF)
    17 December 2018
    Multi-media

    For most farmers and their families, opium cultivation is a means of survival, especially in the context poverty, insecurity, and repression. This film sensitively portrays the lives of two opium farming families in Myanmar and sheds light on their plight.

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    Whither the WA?

    01 December 2005
    Article
     
  18. Myanmar Opium Farmers Forum at the Commission on Narcotic Drugs in October 2018

    Myanmar Opium Farmers Forum (MOFF)
    30 October 2018
    Multi-media

    The voice of communities involved in illicit cultivation had long been excluded from policymaking platforms. However, thanks to growing networks such as the Myanmar Opium Farmers Forum, more and more farmers have gained more space to provide input to drug policy discussions at the UN level.

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