Search results

20 items
  1. Agrarian climate justice: Imperative and opportunity

    • Jun Borras, Jennifer Franco
    21 February 2018
    Paper

    Global pressure on land and natural resources is mounting, with mainstream narratives about climate change often intensifying pressure to replace so-called "inefficient" users of land, including small farmers and pastoralists with market-based dynamics and actors. This dynamic makes the pursuit of socially just land policy ever more important and urgent, while at the same time creating new challenges. The fundamental connections and tensions between agrarian and climate justice must be reckoned with, and movements on both sides must deepen their understanding.

  2. Decriminalise agro-forestry!

    • Oliver Springate-Baginski
    22 May 2018
    Primer

    Shifting cultivation is a form of agro-forestry in which the cultivation of annual agricultural crops is combined with fallowing long enough for trees to grow before the plot is cultivated again. Why is shifting cultivation so controversial, and why do different stake­holders hold such divergent views - for some a valuable and honourable tradition but for others virtually a criminal activity?

  3. Paradigm Trap

    • Walden Bello
    24 May 2018
    Report

    Can Myanmar take a path to sustainable development that avoids the pitfalls of the orthodox development paradigm? This report argues that this is not only necessary but possible.

  4. A landscape of ocean and land-control grabbing in Northern Tanintharyi, Myanmar

    • Mads Barbesgaard
    20 November 2018

    After a spout of optimism surrounding Myanmar’s so-called democratic transition in the post-2010 period, more recent work by CSOs and academics have emphasized the rampant and violent processes of land and ocean grabbing that this transition is facilitating. Drawing on a case from Northern Tanintharyi in the Southeast of the country, this article attempts to historicize contemporary accounts of these grabbing processes.

  5. Trends in small-scale fishery in Myanmar: Tenure rights and gender in Mon State and Tanintharyi Division

    • Maria Belen Angeles, Mads Barbesgaard, Jennifer Franco
    12 March 2019
    Paper

    “Fish is the world’s most traded food commodity, and Myanmar is on the cusp of becoming a major international source."

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    NGOs, Farmers Concerned After Reviewing Draft Land Use Policy

    Zarni Mann
    01 November 2014
    In the media

    Some 70 representatives of farmers’ organizations and civil society organizations from different parts of Burma gathered during a three-day meeting in Rangoon this week to hold the first of a number of discussions on the government’s new draft national land use policy.

  7. The right to land at crossroads in Myanmar

    Jennifer Franco
    05 July 2016
    Article

    What is the role of land in establishing lasting future peace in Myanmar? The country is at a crossroads, and facing rapid land polarization. However, the inauguration of a new government chosen by a landslide in historic elections offers an unprecedented opportunity to change course in a positive direction. An approach that prioritizes poor, vulnerable and marginalized groups especially ethnic nationalities, women, and youth, could lay a foundation for peace.

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    Fears over growth in land concessions

    10 June 2013
    In the media

    Activists have raised concerns about continued growth in large-scale land concessions to agribusinesses, warning that small-scale landholders are being left without a source of income.

  9. Civil Society Groups Demand National Land Restitution Policy for Displaced Communities

    09 June 2016
    In the media

    The Irrawaddy - Several of Burma’s civil society organizations (CSOs) and ethnic community leaders have called for the government to develop a national land restitution policy for communities displaced by conflict.

  10. The Meaning of Land in Myanmar

    • Jennifer Franco, Hannah Twomey, Khu Khu Ju, Pietje Vervest, Tom Kramer
    28 January 2016
    Primer

    “Land is like our vein; it is vital for our living. After our land was confiscated, we don’t know what to do for our livelihood,” says a farmer from Kachin State in Myanmar. Today many inhabitants of rural communities in Myanmar live under threat of losing their lands in a battle for resources spurred by ethnic conflict, exploitative land laws, and powerful economic actors. The existence of a legal right to the land does not translate into that right being respected in practice, and people across the country are now working to protect their right to the land.

  11. Hydropower in Myanmar: For Whose Benefit?

    Nang Shining
    16 December 2016
    Article

    Amidst the many challenges Myanmar now faces, the threats to the environment are urgent – and they are growing more extreme. The situation is especially serious in the case of mega dams and hydropower where a host of projects are being promoted, without appropriate planning or public consultation, that are likely to cause irreversible harm to communities and natural ecosystems around the country. Not only are many of the projects located in nationality areas that are conflict zones, but the bulk of the energy produced will also be exported to neighbouring countries.

  12. About Myanmar in Focus

    20 May 2010

    TNI's Myanmar in Focus project strengthens (ethnic) civil society and political actors to deal with the challenges brought about by the rapid opening-up of the country, while also working to bring about an inclusive and sustainable peace. TNI has developed a unique expertise on Myanmar’s ethnic regions, and through its programme is bringing the whole Institute’s work on agrarian justice, alternative development and a humane drugs policy together.

       
  13. Enclosing the oceans and our aquatic resources

    16 March 2017
    Report

    Top-down conservation projects, (Eco-)tourism, large-scale aquaculture and the expansion of industrial infrastructure are transforming Myanmar. Myanmar's coastal and inland aquatic resources are vast, but these evolving processes and dynamics raise important questions about who benefits from using these resources, who gets to access them and where control lies.

  14. Pro-Business or Pro-Poor?

    23 October 2014
    Paper

    What are the potential implications for Myanmars majority rural working poor now after the unveiling of the much-awaited draft national land use policy?

  15. The draft land use policy: putting big business first

    Jennifer Franco
    11 December 2014
    Article

    There are some big problems with the current draft of the policy and they stem mainly from its failure to recognise that land has more than an economic function.

  16. Land Confiscations and Collective Action in Myanmar’s Dawei Special Economic Zone Area: Implications for Rural Democratization

    • Yukari Sekine
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    The recent political and economic liberalization in Burma/Myanmar, while indicative of some positive steps toward democratisation, has increased foreign and domestic investments and geared the economy toward industrialisation and large-scale agriculture. Land governance procedures and implementation tend to favour the more powerful and well-connected, with little protection mechanism for the majority smallholding farmers in the country.

  17. The Challenge of Democratic and Inclusive Land Policymaking in Myanmar

    • Jennifer Franco, Pietje Vervest, Tom Kramer, Alberto Alonso-Fradejas, Hannah Twomey
    16 February 2015
    Report

    Myanmar's National Land Use Policy promises to make profound changes to the current economic, social, and political-institutional landscape. This is an important and bold step, but its impact will depend on how it addresses the often “messy” details of actual land based social relations.

  18. ‘There is no voice of real farmers’

    Portia Larlee
    11 December 2014
    Article

    The release of the draft policy, part of a process towards enacting a new National Land Law and “harmonising” existing legislation, was greeted with objections and criticism from farmers’ organisations and ethnic minority groups throughout the country.