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42 items
  1. Myanmar Opium Farmers' Forum report published today

    14 December 2015
    Press release

    Today the Myanmar Opium Farmers' Forum released the report of its third meeting. The report stresses that farmers grow opium to ensure food security for their families and to provide for basic needs, and to have access to health and education. According to the report, "The large majority of opium farmers are not rich and grow it for their survival. Therefore, they should not be treated as criminals."

  2. China's drug habit fuels return of the Golden Triangle

    17 September 2015
    In the media

    BBC News - By the end of this year Myanmar should have been free of narcotics. Instead, production of opium is soaring and the East Asian country, once part of the fabled Golden Triangle, is the second largest producer in the world. Axel Kronholm investigates why.

  3. The drug war in the Myanmar's mountains

    06 November 2015
    In the media

    IRIN - The reasons behind Myanmar’s six decades of ethnic warfare are many and varied, but General “Robert” Ar Nyun can tell you in a word why his group began fighting the government four years ago: drugs.

  4. Third Myanmar Opium Farmers’ Forum

    14 December 2015
    Report

    Current drug control polices in South-east Asia are repressive and criminalise opium farmers, greatly affecting the lives of communities cultivating opium. Most policy responses – including from some armed opposition groups – focus on eradication of poppy fields and the implementation of strict bans on opium cultivation.

  5. Paradigm Trap

    • Walden Bello
    24 May 2018
    Report

    Can Myanmar take a path to sustainable development that avoids the pitfalls of the orthodox development paradigm? This report argues that this is not only necessary but possible.

  6. Enclosing the oceans and our aquatic resources

    16 March 2017
    Report

    Top-down conservation projects, (Eco-)tourism, large-scale aquaculture and the expansion of industrial infrastructure are transforming Myanmar. Myanmar's coastal and inland aquatic resources are vast, but these evolving processes and dynamics raise important questions about who benefits from using these resources, who gets to access them and where control lies.

  7. Myanmar CSOs push for urgent measures during the COVID-19 pandemic

    01 June 2020
    Declaration

    Myanmar Civil Society organizations and networks urge the Myanmar government and other relevant stakeholders to take urgent measures during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  8. Arakan National Conference, Kyaukpyu, 2014

    Arakan (Rakhine State): A Land in Conflict on Myanmar’s Western Frontier

    • Martin Smith
    18 December 2019
    Report

    Rakhine State, historically known as Arakan, represents the post-colonial failures of Myanmar in microcosm: ethnic conflict, political impasse, militarisation, economic neglect and the marginalisation of local peoples. During the past decade, many of these challenges have gathered a new intensity, accentuating a Buddhist-Muslim divide and resulting in one of the greatest refugee crises in the modern world. A land of undoubted human and natural resource potential, Rakhine State has become one of the poorest territories in the country today.

  9. From War to Peace in Kayah (Karenni) State

    • Tom Kramer, Oliver Russell, Martin Smith
    29 June 2018
    Report
    Kayah State, historically known as “Karenni State”, is an example of the reform dilemmas that the ethnic nationality peoples in Myanmar face today. Although the country’s smallest state, it reflects many of the challenges in peace-building and socio-political transition that need resolution in Myanmar at large: political impasse, a multiplicity of conflict actors, contested natural resources, land grabbing, humanitarian suffering, and divided communities seeking to rebuild after more than six decades of civil war.
     
  10. Implementation of Burma’s Vacant, Fallow and Virgin Land Management Law: At Odds with the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement and Peace Negotiations

    Jason Gelbort
    10 December 2018
    Article

    Land rights of peoples must be protected to improve prospects for peace.

  11. “Not About Us Without Us”: Legitimate national land law making by design

    Transnational Institute (TNI)
    17 December 2019
    Article

    As the government meets to design a “roadmap” for developing the new national land law, TNI looks at how the situation has changed since the development of the National Land Use policy a few years ago and reflects on the issues at stake for millions of people across the country with rights to land in the current context. 

  12. The right to land at crossroads in Myanmar

    Jennifer Franco
    05 July 2016
    Article

    What is the role of land in establishing lasting future peace in Myanmar? The country is at a crossroads, and facing rapid land polarization. However, the inauguration of a new government chosen by a landslide in historic elections offers an unprecedented opportunity to change course in a positive direction. An approach that prioritizes poor, vulnerable and marginalized groups especially ethnic nationalities, women, and youth, could lay a foundation for peace.

  13. About Myanmar in Focus

    20 May 2010

    TNI's Myanmar in Focus project strengthens (ethnic) civil society and political reform to deal with the challenges brought about by the rapid opening-up of the country, while also working to bring about an inclusive and sustainable peace. TNI has developed a unique expertise on Myanmar’s ethnic regions, and through its programme is bringing the whole Institute’s work on agrarian justice, alternative development and a humane drugs policy together. The work in Myanmar is coordinated from the Amsterdam office.

       
  14. The Generation to Enjoy Peace?

    Lahpai Seng Raw
    17 March 2016
    Article

    We are at a critical juncture in our history, more promising than at any time in recent memory. The country will have a civilian-majority government that came to office through the votes of a multitude of smaller nationality groups for a pan-national party promising political change. If this political transition is to succeed, poverty must be alleviated, corruption curtailed, drug abuse radically reduced, and a host of other social crises addressed that have long blighted our country.

  15. ‘There is no vacant land’

    • Oliver Springate-Baginski
    06 March 2019
    Primer

    This Primer promotes a deeper understanding and appreciation of Myanmar's customary tenure systems, which are under threat from the government's new land policies. It looks at the nature and origin of traditional land and resource use customs and the functions these fulfill in Myanmar's rural communities.

  16. Access Denied: Land Rights and Ethnic Conflict in Burma

    • Burma Centrum Netherlands
    08 May 2013
    Policy briefing

    The new land and investment laws benefit large corporate investors and not small- holder farmers, especially in ethnic minority regions, and do not take into account land rights of ethnic communities.

  17. Panglong monument with Shwedagon replica in background

    Beyond Panglong: Myanmar’s National Peace and Reform Dilemma

    19 September 2017
    Policy briefing

    How is the peace process in Myanmar going? What progress has been made toward reform? After decades under military rule, the 21st Century Panglong Conference has been welcomed as the most encouraging recent initiative to address humanitarian suffering and national instability. It prioritises ethnic peace and political reform at a moment of opportunity for national reconciliation. However, as ethnic conflict and refugee displacement continue worrying failings have started to appear, raising many warnings from the country’s troubled history.

  18. The Challenge of Democratic and Inclusive Land Policymaking in Myanmar

    • Jennifer Franco, Pietje Vervest, Tom Kramer, Alberto Alonso-Fradejas, Hannah Twomey
    16 February 2015
    Report

    Myanmar's National Land Use Policy promises to make profound changes to the current economic, social, and political-institutional landscape. This is an important and bold step, but its impact will depend on how it addresses the often “messy” details of actual land based social relations.

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