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8 items
  1. cover_life_in_a_shrimp_zone

    Life in a Shrimp Zone

    • Kasia Paprocki, Jason Cons
    01 January 2013
    Policy briefing

    What are the class-differentiated implications of food sovereignty in a zone of ecological crisis—Bangladesh’s coastal Khulna district? Much land in this deltaic zone that had previously been employed for various forms of peasant production has been overrun and transformed by the introduction of brackish-water shrimp aquaculture.

  2. Thumbnail

    The Politics of Property in Industrial Fisheries

    • Liam Campling, Elizabeth Havice
    01 January 2013
    Paper

    Fisheries systems are widely considered to be ‘in crisis’ in both economic and ecological terms, a considerable concern given their significance to food security, international trade and employment the world over. The most common explanation for the crisis suggests that it is caused by weak and illiberal property regimes.

  3. king_of_the_sea

    King of the Sea: Seafood Sovereignty and the Blue Revolution

    • Craig K. Harris
    01 January 2013
    Paper

    Nine ways in which food sovereignty issues affect both the production and consumption of food from marine and freshwater aquatic food systems.

  4. Fisherfolks are Pushing the Solution, Not the Illusion of Blue Carbon

    Riza Damanik
    09 December 2015
    Opinion

    In addition to having a strategic role as a provider of jobs, food needs, and economic sustainability, small-scale fisheries also become an important driver in conserving fish and natural resources through a variety of local knowledge.

  5. Blue Carbon: Ocean Grabbing in Disguise?

    • Mads Barbesgaard
    01 February 2016
    Policy issue

    Will blue carbon projects have similar consequences for coastal communities as the negative socio-ecological impact from the market-based mitigation efforts on land (REDD-ii)

  6. Blue Growth and Ocean Grabbing: A Historical Materialist Perspective on Fisheries in East Africa

    • Florian Doerr
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    The concepts of “accumulation by dispossession” and “ocean grabbing” are applied to East Africa in order to explain the ongoing dispossession of small scale fisheries. The emergence of a corporate (sea) food regime can be traced, posing challenges for terrestrial food sovereignty via land grabbing and ocean grabbing.

  7. Human Rights vs Property Rights

    21 November 2016
    Paper

    This new report shows how the 'rights-based approach' to fisheries governance is in fact a mechanism for depriving indigenous and subsistence fisherfolk of their traditional waters and transferring them to corporations and economic elites. It must be replaced with a human rights approach.

  8. A landscape of ocean and land-control grabbing in Northern Tanintharyi, Myanmar

    • Mads Barbesgaard
    20 November 2018

    After a spout of optimism surrounding Myanmar’s so-called democratic transition in the post-2010 period, more recent work by CSOs and academics have emphasized the rampant and violent processes of land and ocean grabbing that this transition is facilitating. Drawing on a case from Northern Tanintharyi in the Southeast of the country, this article attempts to historicize contemporary accounts of these grabbing processes.