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68 items
  1. sustainable agro-business, Uruguay

    Energy democracy and public ownership

    Daniel Chavez
    04 December 2018
    Article

    Uruguay and Costa Rica are world leaders in clean, public, democratically accountable energy. Their success owes much to state-owned companies with the power to drive systemic change.

  2. Towards a comprehensive analysis of South Africa’s electricity sector, the necessary energy transition, and the role of a radically reformed public utility

    14 May 2019
    Other news

    TNI is working with the Alternative Information and Development Centre (AIDC), Trade Unions for Energy Democracy (TUED), and South Africa's National Union of Metalworkers (NUMSA) and National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) in developing a road map to establish a new public electricity system based on a progressive restructuring of Eskom, the country’s state-owned power company. To this end, a Reference Group has been set up with researchers from these organisations.

  3. How Public Banks Can Help Finance a Green and Just Energy Transformation

    • Thomas Marois
    15 November 2017
    Paper

    Every day public banks are developing new and innovative ways of financing a green transformation. This issue brief explores the lessons from two public banks, one in Costa Rica  and the other in Germany.

  4. Energy Democracy: How can we regain control over our energy system? A question of ownership

    09 December 2015 - Event

    We often use the term "Commons" to explain, that we aim at transforming our societal organization. But which realistic concepts do we have at hand to regain the control over our energy system? We need to ask the question of ownership: Shall the energy system pass into public ownership? Shall we fight for it on all levels, at the municipal, regional and national level?

  5. Large-scale bioenergy must be excluded from the renewable energy definition

    30 November 2015
    Declaration

    We, the signatories of this declaration, are calling on the European Union (EU) to exclude bioenergy from its next Renewable Energy Directive (RED), and thereby stop direct and indirect subsidies for renewable energy from biofuels and wood-burning.

  6. The meaning, relevance and scope of energy democracy

    Daniel Chavez
    09 October 2015
    Article

    What does the concept of energy democracy offer to the struggle against climate change and energy poverty?

  7. Power without responsibility? The rise of China and India

    Praful Bidwai
    16 September 2010

    As the Asia-Europe Summit gets ready to meet in early October, what are the implications of the rising power of Asia for progress on tackling poverty, inequality and climate change?

  8. Atlas of Utopias

    • Transnational Institute (TNI)
    21 March 2018
    Infograph

    The Atlas of Utopias is a global gallery of inspiring community-led transformation in water, energy and housing. It features 32 communities from 19 countries working on bold solutions to our world’s systemic economic, social and ecological crises.

  9. BP-Style Extreme Energy Nightmares to Come: Four Scenarios for the Next Energy Mega-Disaster

    Michael Klare
    13 July 2010
    Article

    The BP Gulf oil spill is not an anomaly but the result of industry-wide recklessness, as companies employ more and more risky methods to reach inaccessible reserves as the conventional ones run dry.

  10. From GDPism to genuine equity

    Praful Bidwai
    19 July 2010
    Article

    India's story starkly illustrates the disconnect between GDP and social progress, and the need for radically new economics developed from the bottom up.

  11. Energy Transition and Democracy: Two inseparable paths

    09 October 2019 - Event

    A three-day programme that will offer an overview of the global energetic model and will look into the conflicts, struggles, resistances and experiences of several agents and movements confronting it.

  12. Learning from Fukushima: India must put nuclear power on hold

    Praful Bidwai
    14 April 2011
    Article

    As the Japanese nuclear crisis escalates in severity, and the myth about nuclear energy being safe is exposed - movements around the world are calling for a change of policy and moratoriums on plant construction.

  13. The Nuclear Crisis in Japan: a Wake-Up Call for India

    Achin Vanaik, Praful Bidwai
    31 March 2011
    Article

    The Japanese crisis is a wake up call for India, which is currently building of one of the world's largest nuclear power plants at Jaitapur, despite massive popular protest. When such a disaster can occur in an industrially advanced country like Japan, India, whose atomic agency is notorious for its poor safety standards, needs to rethink its nuclear ambitions.

  14. A test for India’s foreign policy

    Praful Bidwai
    02 June 2011
    Article

    While countries all over the world review their nuclear energy plans and safety measures in the wake of the Fukushima disaster, the Indian government still pushes ahead with it's fiercely opposed Jaitapur plant.

  15. Thumbnail

    Fracking and the Democratic Deficit in South Africa

    • David Fig
    11 July 2012
    Paper

    When citizens are left out of debates confined to government and the business community, the only means of influencing policy is to petition, protest, or litigate, usually after the horse has bolted. Will fracking be the latest technology introduced without any public debate?

  16. Jaitapur draws blood

    Praful Bidwai
    28 April 2011
    Article

    Indian protest against nuclear power plans are answered with violent oppression. The brute force used to counter the public protests only worsens the situation and already has claimed one life.

  17. Dangerous nuclear delusion

    Praful Bidwai
    26 May 2010
    Article

    Small farmers are being driven off their land in Maharashtra to make way for the Indian government's planned "nuclear park" - to be built by the French company AREVA. Yet, nuclear energy is notoriously slow, costly, inefficient and dangerous to develop, as demonstrated by a global decline in nuclear power that contradicts recent government enthusiasm.

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