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  1. Indonesia and the New War on Drugs

    Dania Putri
    24 September 2015
    Article

    Following the dramatic executions of drug traffickers in April 2015, the Indonesian government decided to step up its anti-narcotics efforts, reinforcing public condemnation of drugs while slashing activists' hopes for progressive reforms.

  2. Meth Trafficking Has Exploded Throughout Asia Despite Hardline Laws

    28 May 2015
    In the media

    Vice News - Methamphetamine seizures in East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Oceania have exploded in recent years, nearly quadrupling from some 11 tons in 2008 to 42 tons in 2013, according to a report released Tuesday by the United Nations' Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

  3. Amphetamine Type Stimulants and Harm Reduction

    • Tom Blickman
    01 October 2011
    Policy briefing

    Little is known about the methamphetamine market in the region, but there are strong indications that the situation is deteriorating with substances becoming stronger, methods of use more harmful and the number of users steadily increasing. There is an urgent need for donors and governments to introduce effective harm reduction measures.

  4. insite-injecting

    Speeding up the response

    • Sophie Pinkham
    01 April 2010

    Despite heavy media coverage of amphetamines and increased research attention in some countries, the harm reduction response remains underdeveloped when compared with the response to opiates and injecting-related harms. Programmes do exist and new guidance is being compiled, but there is a need for evaluation, further documentation of experiences and expansion of effective interventions. This chapter will discuss the emerging responses to amphetamines-related harms and consider the next steps for the international harm reduction community.

     

  5. The fast and the furious

    • Jean-Paul Grund, Philip Coffin, Marie Jauffret-Roustide, Minke Dijkstra, Dick de Bruin, Peter Blanken
    01 April 2010

    Harm reduction programmes targeting stimulants like cocaine and (meth)amphetamines in several countries have shown positive results. However, these programmes are limited to Australia and North America. As the effectiveness of pharmacological and psycho­social interventions for stimulant users is limited, interventions to stabilise and mini­mise the negative consequences of ongoing meth­ampheta­mine use are of paramount importance. A wide range of health and social problems associated with stimulant use are largely unaddressed by current services.

     

  6. Randomized controlled trial of dexamphetamine maintenance for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence

    • Marie Longo, Wendy Wickes, Matthew Smout, Sonia Harrison, Sharon Cahill, Jason M. White
    18 June 2009

    This study tested the impact of a long-acting form of amphetamine as medication to help control dependent use of the closely allied stimulant, methamphetamine. Prescribed usually for the treatment of pathological sleepiness or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, effects of the amphetamine tablets prescribed in the study take several hours longer to emerge than normal amphetamine and last three to six hours longer, giving it a 'smoothing' profile similar to methadone for heroin users; non-rapid onset make it less intensely pleasurable, and longer duration suits it to once-daily administration.

     

  7. The ATS Boom in Southeast Asia

    • Tom Blickman
    15 January 2009

    In the 1990s, Southeast Asia experienced a boom in the production and consumption of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS), in particular methamphetamines (meth). At the same time, the region has seen a declining opium market, although the downward trend may well be versing now. How exactly these two phenomena interrelate is still an unresolved question. The ATS market seems to have its own distinct dynamics; for users, the availability and accessibility of opium and heroin have an impact on ATS use and vice versa, and some former heroin producers have moved to producing ATS.

     

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    Substitution therapy for amphetamine users

    • James Shearer, John Sherman, Alex Wodak, Ingrid van Beek
    31 May 2002

    publicationThe illicit use of amphetamines continues to be a growing problem in many countries around the world, yet treatment responses remain in need of further development. This is particularly true with regards to pharmacotherapy for amphetamine dependence. In this Harm Reduction Digest four authors who bring together considerable research and clinical experience in this area describe the nature of amphetamine-related problems and consider the role of amphetamine agonists in substitution therapy for amphetamine dependence.

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