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36 items
  1. CND 2015 Side Event: E-Book of Authorities

    13 March 2015 - Event

    The “E-Book of Authorities” is a civil society-led project to catalogue agreed UN statements and language on a selection of key topics. It aims to show the extent of existing international support for evidence-based drug policies, and to support international drug policy discussions, debates and negotiations.

    Mozart Room (in the Restaurant), Vienna International Centre

    E-Book of Authorities

     

  2. US objects to Bolivia bid for licit coca-chewing

    Frank Bajak
    20 January 2011
    In the media

    The United States will file a formal objection to Bolivia's proposal to end the ban on coca leaf-chewing specified by a half-century-old U.N. treaty.

  3. War of Words: The International Narcotics Control Board vs. A Changing World

    Phillip Smith
    04 March 2014
    In the media

    The global drug prohibition bureaucracy's watchdog group, the International Drug Control Board (INCB) released its Annual Report 2013 today, voicing its concerns with and wagging its finger at drug reform efforts that deviate from its interpretation of the international drug control treaties that birthed it. The INCB is "concerned" about moves toward marijuana legalization and warns about "the importance of universal implementation of international drug control treaties by all states."

  4. Meth Trafficking Has Exploded Throughout Asia Despite Hardline Laws

    28 May 2015
    In the media

    Vice News - Methamphetamine seizures in East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Oceania have exploded in recent years, nearly quadrupling from some 11 tons in 2008 to 42 tons in 2013, according to a report released Tuesday by the United Nations' Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

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    "Drug War" Policies Need a Stint in Rehab

    Tom Kramer, Stephen Leahy
    03 May 2010
    In the media

    Canada, April 29, 2010 (IPS) - The war on drugs is a complete failure everywhere, according a comprehensive review of 20 years of scientific literature released at the Harm Reduction 2010 conference in Liverpool, England that wraps up Thursday.

  6. The 2009 Commission on Narcotic Drugs

    09 April 2009 - Event

    The 2009 Commission on Narcotic Drugs and its High Level Segment (HLS) marked the end of the 2-year process of the 10-year review of the 1998 United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on the World Drug Problem. The event was marked by the call of the President of Bolivia, Evo Morales, to remove the coca leaf from the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, which represented the first ever truly open challenge by any nation state to the structure of the international drug control system. The HLS adopted a new Political Declaration and Plan of Action. A dissenting Interpretative Statement by 26 countries on harm reduction, not mentioned in the Political Declaration, marked a clear divide in drug control approaches.

  7. Another UN agency savages the drug war

    George Murkin (Transform Blog)
    16 March 2015
    In the media

    The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the UN agency charged with developing strategies to reduce global poverty, has strongly criticised current international drug policy, highlighting the disastrous costs it is producing – particularly for the world’s poor. In the agency’s formal submission to the UN General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on drugs (PDF), launched at the annual UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs which began last week in Vienna, the UNDP argues:

  8. Reform or Perseverance Forum Predicts Outcomes at UN Next Year

    02 November 2015
    In the media

    Women of China - On Friday October 23, the Brookings-Tsinghua Center for Public Policy "Reform or Perseverance" panel discussion took place in Beijing, for experts to discuss findings from a recent evaluation into the effectiveness and costs of international drugs policy, ahead of next year's UN meeting on the "World Drug Problem" (UNGASS 2016).

  9. Events at the 63rd Session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs

    02 March 2020 - Event

    The 63rd Sesssion of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs takes place from 2nd to 6th March 2020. TNI and its partners will participate at this annual series of meetings and co-hosts five side events on 5th and 6th March 2020.

  10. Bolivia Steps Up Campaign at U.N. to Legalise Coca Leaf

    Haider Rizvi
    05 May 2011
    In the media

    Is coca a dangerous drug that should be tightly regulated, or an essential part of Andean indigenous people's cultural and medicinal heritage? Or perhaps both?

  11. A call to reprioritise metrics to evaluate illicit drug policy

    02 April 2016
    In the media

    The Lancet - On April 19–21, 2016, the UN General Assembly Special Session on Drugs (UNGASS) will convene to chart a course for the future to tackle the world's drugs problem. The 2016 UNGASS represents a rare opportunity to reassess the global approach to drugs and to move towards drug policies that more effectively address the three UN pillars of peace and security, human development, and human rights. We believe that we need a new consensus that includes a commitment to revise the range of indicators used to assess and improve drug policy effectiveness.

  12. Seventeen objections to abolishing the ban on coca chewing

    Tom Blickman
    07 February 2011
    In the media

    The final count after closure of the January 31 deadline to file objections to the Bolivian amendment to remove the ban on coca leaf chewing in the 1961 UN Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, comes to 17 objections: the US, UK, Sweden, Canada, Denmark, Germany, the Russian Federation, Japan, Singapore, Slovakia, Estonia, France, Italy, Bulgaria, Latvia, Malaysia and Mexico. That means that only 17 of the 184 countries that are Party to the treaty (as amended by the 1972 Protocol) have filed an objection. We call on them to still reconsider and withdraw their objection before the issue appears on the UN agenda for a decision.

  13. The 2008 Commission on Narcotic Drugs

    13 April 2008 - Event

    The 51st Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) was designated as the point at which the international community would debate the progress made in the 10 years since the Political Declaration of the 1998 UN General Assembly Special Session on Drugs (UNGASS). The 1998 UNGASS called for the eradication or significant reduction of the cultivation, supply and demand of illicit drugs. Few governments acknowledged the real policy dilemmas arising from the failure to achieve these reductions, or came forward with proposals on how the international drug control system could be improved. One of the most debated issues was a resolution on human rights and international drug control introduced by Uruguay.

     

  14. How marijuana legalization in Colorado and Washington is making the world a better place

    Christopher Ingraham
    20 October 2014
    In the media

    It's time to explore a multilateral reworking of the drug control treaties to better reflect current realities.

  15. Region's harsh drug policy slammed by experts

    05 May 2016
    In the media

    The Globe - Southeast Asia - Following a UN conference on drugs last month, countries in the region are being accused of sticking with ineffective and harmful anti-drug policies

  16. New agreement brings no end to war on drugs in ASEAN

    26 April 2016
    In the media

    Myanmar Times - A global meeting on drugs failed to deliver a highly anticipated shift from a punitive approach to narcotics, disappointing Myanmar advocacy groups.

  17. Opium poppy farmers reject crop ban, war on drugs

    25 January 2016
    In the media

    Myanmar Times - Opium poppy farmers from Myanmar attending an international conference on “prohibited plants” have rejected a ban on growing their crops and urged an end to forced eradication.

  18. Advocacy groups call for drug policy reset ahead of UN meeting

    07 April 2016
    In the media

    Myanmar Times - Repressive drug laws and corruption have contributed to Myanmar’s spiralling narcotics problem, according to advocacy groups, who are calling on the new government to launch a change of policy.

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