Search results

8 items
  1. Ending the futile war on drugs

    Fernando Henrique Cardoso
    27 December 2010
    Other news

    The war on drugs is a lost war, and 2011 is the time to move away from a punitive approach in order to pursue a new set of policies based on public health, human rights, and commonsense. These were the core findings of the Latin American Commission on Drugs and Democracy that I convened, together with former presidents Ernesto Zedillo of Mexico and Cesar Gaviria of Colombia.

  2. Thumbnail

    Drogas y dogmas

    Juan Gabriel Tokatlian
    24 December 2010
    Other news

    El objetivo fundamental de la prohibición es lograr la abstinencia frente a determinadas sustancias psicoactivas y así crear una sociedad libre de drogas. Ello implica, en consecuencia, eliminar el cultivo, la producción, el procesamiento, el tráfico, la distribución, la comercialización, la financiación, la venta y el uso de un conjunto específico de sustancias psicoactivas declaradas ilegales.

  3. The only winner in the 'war on drugs'

    Juan Gabriel Tokatlian
    02 December 2010
    Other news

    The outcome of this militarisation of drugs policy has been overwhelmingly negative. Military involvement in such an irregular war was not only unrealistic, but has also proved counterproductive. Every once in a while, a momentous triumph is announced in one or another country. But within a few years, the proliferation of front lines in the "war on drugs" reveals that such "success" was, at best, a pyrrhic victory. Meanwhile, democracy deteriorates, national insecurity spreads and human rights violations worsen.

  4. Drugs are a development issue - which is why we should legalise them

    Jonathan Glennie
    05 October 2010
    Other news

    If there is a "war on drugs", this is it. Mexico is undergoing worse violence than has been seen in Latin America in decades. President Felipe Calderon's decision to take the fight to the narcos has been returned with drug gang brutality on a massive scale. If any good is to come out of the tragedy afflicting Mexico, it is that the misguided global approach to drug regulation will be challenged and may, eventually, be changed.

  5. Thumbnail

    The Budgetary Impact of Ending Drug Prohibition

    • Jeffrey A. Miron, Katherine Waldock
    29 September 2010

    BudgetaryImpactCoverThe CATO report estimates that legalizing drugs would save roughly $41.3 billion per year in government expenditure on enforcement of prohibition. Of these savings, $25.7 billion would accrue to state and local governments, while $15.6 billion would accrue to the federal government. Approximately $8.7 billion of the savings would result from legalization of marijuana and $32.6 billion from legalization of other drugs.

    application-pdfDownload the document (PDF)

  6. The Budgetary Impact of Ending Drug Prohibition

    • Jeffrey A. Miron, Katherine Waldock
    29 September 2010

    The CATO report estimates that legalizing drugs would save roughly $41.3 billion per year in government expenditure on enforcement of prohibition. Of these savings, $25.7 billion would accrue to state and local governments, while $15.6 billion would accrue to the federal government. Approximately $8.7 billion of the savings would result from legalization of marijuana and $32.6 billion from legalization of other drugs.

     

  7. Thumbnail

    "La guerra contra las drogas no funciona. Hay que cambiar la receta"

    13 July 2010
    Other news

    El ex presidente de Brasil, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, defiende la despenalización del consumo de drogas. Junto con los ex presidentes de México y Colombia, Ernesto Zedillo y César Gaviria respectivamente, sostiene el proyecto de Declaración de Viena, que exige poner fin a la actual estrategia prohibicionista que está causando estragos sociales y fomentando la epidemia del sida.

  8. US waves white flag in disastrous 'war on drugs'

    Hugh O'Shaughnessy
    16 January 2010
    Other news

    After 40 years of defeat and failure, America's "war on drugs" is being buried in the same fashion as it was born – amid bloodshed, confusion, corruption and scandal. US agents are being pulled from South America; Washington is putting its narcotics policy under review, and a newly confident region is no longer prepared to swallow its fatal Prohibition error. Indeed, after the expenditure of billions of dollars and the violent deaths of tens of thousands of people, a suitable epitaph for America's longest "war" may well be the plan, in Bolivia, for every family to be given the right to grow coca in its own backyard.