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    ¿Doblemente (in)falible?

    Rodrigo Uprimny Yepes
    27 February 2015

    Estaba convencido de que el carismático papa Francisco era doblemente infalible. Primero por ser papa, pues según el Concilio Vaticano I de 1870, el sumo pontífice no se equivoca, al menos cuando hace ciertas declaraciones en las que se supone que es asistido por el Espíritu Santo. Y segundo por ser argentino... pues al menos los argentinos creen que eso genera infalibilidad.

  2. Mexico: Challenging drug prohibition from below

    Sebastian Scholl
    13 January 2015
    Other news

    The horrific forced disappearance of 43 students in Iguala reveals how organised crime and corruption thrive in conditions of institutional or democratic weakness, shaped to a large extent by distinctive transnational relations (importantly, in this case, with the US). Fortunately groups like the Movement for Peace with Justice and Dignity are showing a burgeoning 'social power' that has the potential to change politics and policy in Mexico.

  3. nixon

    ¿Ha perdido Estados Unidos la guerra contra las drogas?

    Gary S. Becker, Kevin M. Murphy
    06 January 2013
    Other news

    El entonces presidente de Estados Unidos Richard Nixon declaró en 1971 "la guerra contra las drogas". La expectativa era que el narcotráfico en el país podría reducirse drásticamente en poco tiempo mediante operaciones policiales. Sin embargo, la lucha continúa. El costo ha sido grande en términos de vidas, dinero y el bienestar de muchos estadounidenses, especialmente los pobres y los de menor nivel educativo. Según la mayoría de los recuentos, los beneficios de la guerra han sido modestos en el mejor de los casos.

  4. presidentemexico

    Mexico's Narco-Epiphany: Is Calderón Suggesting the U.S. Legalize Drugs?

    Tim Padgett
    30 August 2011
    Other news

    The central statistic of Mexico's violent drug war – 40,000 gangland murders in the past five years – is repeated so often it almost fails to alarm us anymore. But what happened last Thursday, Aug. 25, in the northern business capital of Monterrey – 52 innocent people massacred after gangsters set fire to a casino, presumably in a drug-cartel extortion operation – left even President Felipe Calderón sounding distressed. So agitated, in fact, that drug-war analysts believe Calderón, in his speech the next day, signaled a change in philosophy and told the U.S. to think about legalizing drugs as a way of weakening vicious drug traffickers.

  5. The Drug War Is the Inevitable Result of Capitalism Gone Mad; Ciudad Juarez Is All of Our Futures

    Ed Vulliamy
    21 June 2011
    Other news

    War, as I came to report it, was something fought between people with causes, however crazy or honourable: like between the American and British occupiers of Iraq and the insurgents who opposed them. Then I stumbled across Mexico's drug war – which has claimed nearly 40,000 lives, mostly civilians – and all the rules changed. This is warfare for the 21st century, and another creature altogether.

  6. Four Decades Later, It's Time to Scrap the Dead-End Drug War

    Tim Padgett
    17 June 2011
    Other news

    I recently returned from the desert city of Durango, Mexico, where forensic officials are still trying to identify some 240 corpses discovered this year in mass graves. More than 200 other bodies have been found in similar fosas across northern Mexico. All were victims, many of them innocent victims, of the drug-trafficking violence whose barbarity seems bottomless. But it's fueled in large part by the just as endless American appetite for illegal drugs – which itself is due in no small part to the fact that our anti-drug policies are so narrow-mindedly focused on battling supply instead of reducing demand.

  7. US waves white flag in disastrous 'war on drugs'

    Hugh O'Shaughnessy
    16 January 2010
    Other news

    After 40 years of defeat and failure, America's "war on drugs" is being buried in the same fashion as it was born – amid bloodshed, confusion, corruption and scandal. US agents are being pulled from South America; Washington is putting its narcotics policy under review, and a newly confident region is no longer prepared to swallow its fatal Prohibition error. Indeed, after the expenditure of billions of dollars and the violent deaths of tens of thousands of people, a suitable epitaph for America's longest "war" may well be the plan, in Bolivia, for every family to be given the right to grow coca in its own backyard.