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27 items
  1. Five sites of struggle and potential transformation

    • Zoe Brent, Tanya Kerssen
    21 October 2014
    Report

    Corporate control of the food system in the US continues to undermine the livelihoods of farmers, farmworkers, fisherpeople, communities of color, and indigenous peoples in the US, but there are also increasing examples of community-based resistance, grassroots solidarity, and broad-based alliances that are resisting the corporate takeover.

  2. Agrarian climate justice: Imperative and opportunity

    • Jun Borras, Jennifer Franco
    21 February 2018
    Paper

    Global pressure on land and natural resources is mounting, with mainstream narratives about climate change often intensifying pressure to replace so-called "inefficient" users of land, including small farmers and pastoralists with market-based dynamics and actors. This dynamic makes the pursuit of socially just land policy ever more important and urgent, while at the same time creating new challenges. The fundamental connections and tensions between agrarian and climate justice must be reckoned with, and movements on both sides must deepen their understanding.

  3. Licensed to Grab

    • Pietje Vervest, Timothé Feodoroff
    20 January 2015
    Paper

    The investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) clause present in many trade treaties give investors far-reaching protection, curtailing governments’ ability to regulate for progressive agrarian and agricultural policies and reinforcing the notion of land as a commodity.

  4. Governing Global Land Deals

    18 October 2013
    Book

    New land acquisitions or ‘global land grab'  are drawing upon, restructuring and challenging the nature of both governance and government. While ‘the state’ is often invoked as a key player in contemporary land deals, states do not necessarily operate coherently or with one voice.

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    Perceptions and Practices of Investment

    • Vanessa Lamb, Nga Dao
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    China is one of the major investors in hydropower development in mainland Southeast Asia, yet Chinese involvement in hydropower varies across the region. Popular and expert viewpoints on China’s investment in hydropower also vary widely.

  6. Sons and Daughters of the Earth

    • Food First, Alberto Alonso-Fradejas
    16 April 2013
    Policy briefing

    In the face of violent dispossession and incorporation into an exploitative labor regime, indigenous peasant families in northern Guatemala are struggling to access land and defend their resources as the basis of their collective identity.

  7. Land Conflicts in Argentina

    • Zoe Brent
    16 December 2013
    Policy briefing

    In Argentina, the accumulation of new lands for expanding mining and large-scale agribusiness requires displacement of current occupants. However, peasant resistance is shaping to achieve far-reaching structural change.

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    Beyond the BRICS' Rhetoric: An Inquiry on South-South Land grabbing

    • Tomaso Ferrando
    18 November 2014
    Report

    BRICS countries’ investors play an increasingly crucial role in land investments. Just as the global trend of increased interest and investment in land has led to a surge of land grabbing, BRICS investments have proved no different.

  9. The twin challenge of agrarian and climate justice

    • Jun Borras, Jennifer Franco, Clara Mi Young Park, Mads Barbesgaard, Yukari Sekine, Ye Lin Myint, Thant Zin
    02 March 2018
    Paper

    Dominant approaches to climate change mitigation are putting new pressures on small farmers and village dwellers, justifying dispossession by powerful actors who cast villagers' traditional ways of life as ecologically destructive or economically inefficient. In order to address the twin challenges of agrarian justice and climate justice, it is critical to understand the way new conflicts and initiatives intersect with old conflicts and the way they are compounded by undemocratic settings, and inequality and division along fault-lines of gender, ethnicity, class, and generation.

  10. Governing the Global Land Grab

    • Jennifer Franco, Jun Borras, Chunyu Wang
    19 June 2013
    Policy briefing

    The rise of flex crops—crops with multiple uses across food, feed, fuel and industrial complexes—has far-reaching implications for global land governance.
     

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    The Bioeconomy

    04 November 2015
    Primer

    The bioeconomy is promoted as a response to current global social and environmental crises, with its promise of replacing fossil fuels with ‘renewable’ biological resources. How does it play out on the ground? Who wins and who loses? And what are the alternatives?

  12. Photo credit: Valentina Micheli - https://www.flickr.com/photos/valemic/

    Tourism and Land Grabbing in Bali

    • Ruben Rosenberg Colorni
    09 February 2018
    Report

    The island of Bali is home to a rich and unique system of agriculture, based around traditional water management systems developed over the last 1200 years. However, growing pressure from the expansion of the tourist trade as well as the effects of climate change are putting these systems at risk. Farmers are fighting to preserve their livelihoods and maintain a base for local food sovereignty in Bali, but significant changes to policy and practice are needed to protect their rights to land, water, and seed.

  13. Land for the few Infographics

    • Timothé Feodoroff, Sylvia Kay
    05 December 2016
    Infograph

    A series of infographics that expose the massive concentration of land in Europe. Over the last decade, the EU has lost a third of all its small farms, 3% of its farms now own 52% of farm land, and land inequality has become worse than wealth inequality.

  14. The Meaning of Land in Myanmar

    • Jennifer Franco, Hannah Twomey, Khu Khu Ju, Pietje Vervest, Tom Kramer
    28 January 2016
    Primer

    “Land is like our vein; it is vital for our living. After our land was confiscated, we don’t know what to do for our livelihood,” says a farmer from Kachin State in Myanmar. Today many inhabitants of rural communities in Myanmar live under threat of losing their lands in a battle for resources spurred by ethnic conflict, exploitative land laws, and powerful economic actors. The existence of a legal right to the land does not translate into that right being respected in practice, and people across the country are now working to protect their right to the land.

  15. A ‘Veritable Revolution’

    • Moritz Tenthoff, Ross Eventon
    01 February 2013
    Policy briefing

    This report looks into the new land restitution law, which Santos portrays as integral to Colombia’s ‘veritable revolution’, against the backdrop of agrarian policy in Colombia historically.

  16. The Global Ocean Grab: A Primer

    • Jennifer Franco, Pietje Vervest, Timothé Feodoroff, Carsten Pedersen, Ricarda Reuter, Mads Barbesgaard
    02 September 2014
    Primer

    This primer unveils a new wave of ocean grabbing, answering the most important questions about the mechanisms that facilitate it and the impacts on people and the environment.

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    Global Tree Plantation Expansion

    • Markus Kröger
    16 October 2012
    Paper

    The expansion of tree plantations and non-food crops is frequently left out of analysis on land grabbing, but is a crucial part of the picture. This paper provides an up-to-date review of tree plantations worldwide and summarises the latest research and data on their impact.

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    The Politics of Transnational Agrarian Movements

    • Jun Borras
    12 October 2010
    Paper

    Transnational Agrarian Movements (TAMs) have emerged in the last decade, resisting and contesting unfair land policies; but how do they differ from region to region, and how do their ideological, political and institutional differences affect their relationship to international development agencies?

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    A ‘Land Sovereignty’ Alternative?

    • Jennifer Franco, Jun Borras
    06 July 2012
    Report

    Land sovereignty is the right of working peoples to have effective access to, use of, and control over land and the benefits of its use and occupation, where land is understood as resource, territory, and landscape.

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