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    New ‘Webs of Power’ and Agrarian Transformations in Cambodia: Where are the women?

    • Clara Mi Young Park
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    In February 2012 Economic Land Concessions granted to private companies in Cambodia totalled 2,033,664 ha., and increased to 2,289,490 ha. by June 2013, covering 63 per cent of the country’s arable land. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflows to Cambodia grew by 73 per cent from 2011 to 2012. The country, together with Myanmar and Vietnam, is referred to as one of the ‘emerging bright spots of the subregion’.

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    Opening up Markets or Fostering a new Satellite State?

    • Irna Hofman
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    New geopolitical dynamics and the surge for natural resources, such as land, accompany the rise of the BRICS countries in the global arena. In this paper, I discuss the case of Chinese agricultural land investments in the Central Asian state, Tajikistan. Emerging from a Soviet past, Tajikistan seems to be on its way to becoming one of China’s newest satellite states.

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    BRICS and MICs in Bolivia’s ‘value’-chain agriculture

    • Ben McKay
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    A new phase of ‘foreignization’ and land grabbing is occurring via value-chain relations in Bolivia. Exogenous forces from some BRICS and MICs are penetrating Bolivia’s countryside and drastically changing social relations of production, reproduction, property and power.

  4. Chinese and Other Foreign Investments in the Brazilian Soybean Complex

    • Gustavo de L. T. Oliveira
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    As Brazil and China become the world’s leading exporter and importer of soybeans respectively, Chinese companies have sought investments in Brazil to wrest greater control over the flows and profits of the international soybean trade from North Atlantic-based transnational companies. While some promote these as positive “South-South cooperation”, many others condemn them as neocolonial “land grabs” that displace peasants, cause environmental degradation, and deindustrialize the Brazilian economy.