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104 items
  1. Extractivism and resistance in North Africa

    • Hamza Hamouchene
    20 November 2019
    Report

    Northern African countries are key suppliers of natural resources to the global economy, from large- scale oil and gas extraction in Algeria and Tunisia, to phosphate mining in Tunisia and Morocco, to water-intensive agribusiness paired with tourism in Morocco and Tunisia. The commodification of nature and privatisation of resources entailed in these projects has led to serious environmental damages, and forced these countries into a subservient position in the global economy, sustaining and deepening global inequalities.

  2. A View from the Countryside

    • Katie Sandwell, Angélica Castañeda Flores, Lyda Fernanda Forero, Jennifer Franco, Sofia Monsalve Suárez, Andrea Nuila, Philip Seufert
    10 December 2019
    Policy issue

    We urgently need new, revitalised, visions of human rights, and rural communities are in the process of building just these kinds of visions. The climate crisis poses massive threats to human rights, but so do mainstream technical and economic climate ‘solutions’, and rising authoritarian voices around the world. The battle for resources and territories, including land, water, fisheries, and forests is becoming increasingly intense, with land-intensive renewable energy projects and the drive to marketise carbon and biodiversity additional threats to nature and to the livelihoods of rural and indigenous people around the world.

  3. On the Copenhagen UN climate summit or why you need more than butter to bake a cake

    Beatriz Martínez
    08 January 2010
    Article

    So it seems that for once everyone agrees on something: the UN climate summit in Copenhagen was a spectacular failure. That is quite an achievement in itself, since consensus seems a rarity in these times.

  4. The Meaning of Land in Myanmar

    • Jennifer Franco, Hannah Twomey, Pietje Vervest, Tom Kramer
    28 January 2016
    Primer

    “Land is like our vein; it is vital for our living. After our land was confiscated, we don’t know what to do for our livelihood,” says a farmer from Kachin State in Myanmar. Today many inhabitants of rural communities in Myanmar live under threat of losing their lands in a battle for resources spurred by ethnic conflict, exploitative land laws, and powerful economic actors. The existence of a legal right to the land does not translate into that right being respected in practice, and people across the country are now working to protect their right to the land.

  5. Venezuela: terminal crisis of the rentier petro-state?

    • Edgardo Lander, Translator; Sara Shields
    02 October 2014
    Paper

    Venezuela's failure to develop an effective strategy to reduce its economy's dependence on gas and oil threatens the social successes and future viability of the Bolivarian project.

  6. Activism in the Anthropocene

    Kevin Buckland
    08 January 2017
    Article

    The biological, chemical, social and political reality in which all humans beings live is changing our planet and our culture exponentially. This is the Anthropocene – a new geological age characterized by the critical impacts of human activities on the Earth’s systems. As the physical world around us is transformed, so too movements for social change must evolve if they are to have the structural integrity to survive the coming waves, winds and wars.

  7. Assumptions in the European Union biofuels policy: frictions with experiences in Germany, Brazil and Mozambique

    • David Fig, Jennifer Franco, Lucia Goldfarb, Les Levidow, Mireille Hönicke, Maria Luisa Mendonça
    27 July 2010
    Paper

    EU biofuels policy is based on the assumption that it will lead to greenhouse gas savings, energy security and rural development, however in-depth research in Germany, Brazil and Mozambique reveals fundamental contradictions between EU policy assumptions and practices in the real world.

  8. Blue Carbon: Ocean Grabbing in Disguise?

    • Mads Barbesgaard
    01 February 2016
    Policy issue

    Will blue carbon projects have similar consequences for coastal communities as the negative socio-ecological impact from the market-based mitigation efforts on land (REDD-ii)

  9. A Global Green New Deal - Weds 13 May 4pm CET

    A Global Green New Deal

    13 May 2020

    Join our sixth webinar in our series focused this week on a Global Green New Deal featuring Richard Kozul-Wright (UNCTAD), and leading activists from across the globe leading the struggle for a just transition in the wake of the Coronavirus pandemic. (Live interpretation into French and Spanish available)

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    Hoodwinked in the Hothouse

    • aleksej
    09 May 2007
    Book
     
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    Fracking and the Democratic Deficit in South Africa

    • David Fig
    11 July 2012
    Paper

    When citizens are left out of debates confined to government and the business community, the only means of influencing policy is to petition, protest, or litigate, usually after the horse has bolted. Will fracking be the latest technology introduced without any public debate?

  12. Climate talks in Copenhagen: A resource guide

    08 December 2009
    Article

    TNI is in Copenhagen. Read our analysis, blogs, factsheets and other material related to the UN climate talks.

  13. Linking Women and Land in Myanmar

    03 February 2015
    Report

    What are the potential gender implications of the current land use policy draft in Myanmar? How might it be improved to promote and strengthen women’s land rights?

  14. The Challenge of Democratic and Inclusive Land Policymaking in Myanmar

    • Jennifer Franco, Pietje Vervest, Tom Kramer, Alberto Alonso-Fradejas, Hannah Twomey
    16 February 2015
    Report

    Myanmar's National Land Use Policy promises to make profound changes to the current economic, social, and political-institutional landscape. This is an important and bold step, but its impact will depend on how it addresses the often “messy” details of actual land based social relations.

  15. Human Rights in Niassa Province

    25 September 2012
    Report

    How do the treeplantations in Niassa province impair the rights of peasant communities? And what are the recommendations to the different actors involved?

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    Trouble in the Air

    • Patrick Bond, Rehana Dada
    09 May 2007
    Book

    This book explores the impacts of the carbon market in South Africa. Connecting energy privatisation with issues around the enclosure of the atmosphere, this collection of essays gives a good grounding in the justice implications of the new carbon market.

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    Friends of the Earth International reaffirms people power in Paris

    14 December 2015
    Multi-media

    Friends of the Earth`s activists from the five continents and several dozen countries met with representatives of numerous social movements to celebrate the strength of the peoples and reaffirm the need to be united in the struggle for climate justice.

  18. Who’s in the Trade to Climate Caravan?

    Amparo Miciano
    07 December 2009
    Article

    Sixty activists from the global South and Europe are currently touring Europe on their way to Copenhagen. Starting out at Seventh Sessions of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Ministerial Conference in Geneva from 30 November to 2 December, the tour passes through Italy, Germany, France and Belgium before arriving in Copenhagen on 9 December.

  19. The Green Economy: the Wolf in Sheep’s clothing

    • Edgardo Lander
    06 December 2011
    Policy briefing

    The fundamental flaw at the heart of UNEP's report "Towards a Green Economy" is its failure to analyse the extraordinarily unequal power relations that exist in today’s world, and the interests at play in the operation of this global economic system.

  20. Chinese and Other Foreign Investments in the Brazilian Soybean Complex

    • Gustavo de L. T. Oliveira
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    As Brazil and China become the world’s leading exporter and importer of soybeans respectively, Chinese companies have sought investments in Brazil to wrest greater control over the flows and profits of the international soybean trade from North Atlantic-based transnational companies. While some promote these as positive “South-South cooperation”, many others condemn them as neocolonial “land grabs” that displace peasants, cause environmental degradation, and deindustrialize the Brazilian economy.

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